New Blood: Live in London in 3 Dimensions

January 01, 1970

(Eagle Rock; 162 mins)

 

www.eagle-rock.com

 

BY DAVID ISKRA

 

Peter Gabriel is a man in love with technology.  Like
the rest of us he is a big kid who likes to play with shiny new toys. From
sequencers and production tricks, his forward thinking has brought us new
sounds and his early forays into multimedia and virtual reality were ahead of
their time. He was one of the first artists to use the internet to their
advantage and he continues to fight for Human Rights around the globe with
technology through his WITNESS Foundation. Though not always financially
successful he has very few artistic failures in this arena. His secret to
success is to use the technology without allowing it to use you.  It’s
best to expect the unexpected when dealing with this man.

 

Perhaps that is why this DVD is a slight disappointment. On
one hand, his unexpected foray into the world of orchestras and cover songs was
a pleasantly surprising success. Where other artists have failed to achieve
anything new by adding a string section to their greatest hits, Gabriel chose
other artists’ songs and some forgotten gems from his back catalog and breathed
new life into them. This resulted not only in his collection of covers (Scratch my Back) but another album
recorded a year later which was released in conjunction with this DVD. In fact,
there is a CD, DVD, Blu-Ray, 3D Blu Ray and a Special Edition box set.
 Got all that? That’s just the physical media; the downloads have bonus
tracks, exclusives and more. All of these are worth tracking down. In fact, the
DVD which was also released in theaters for a brief run isn’t bad, it just
isn’t great and that is the real shame.

 

Gabriel is a powerhouse live and there are some chill-inducing
moments on this DVD. When he hits that high note during “San
Jacinto,” you’ll wonder if someone left the window open as you’ll
feel chills all over your body. The celebratory “In Your Eyes” will make you
forget all about the album version, and his reconstructed “Wallflower” is both
epic and moving. But you can hear this magic on the CD without wearing 3D
glasses. It’s unnecessary overkill – but not in the same way every blockbuster
in 3D is

 

What I mean is that it’s a shame that the one and only tour
to be captured in 3D is his most restrained. Whereas his Secret World Tour
literally had set pieces and the stage itself moving, lifting, spinning and
rotating throughout the arena, and his UP tour had Gabriel inside a large clear
plastic ball, this tour finds a more subdued performer holding the audience’s
attention. Granted, there are some impressive video screens that were
tastefully integrated into the show, and seeing a full orchestra in 3D is a
rare treat; it’s just that 2D would have sufficed in documenting this tour.

 

In the end, though, you should definitely pick this up and
just hope that his back catalog gets the 3D treatment too.

 

EXTRAS: Behind the
scenes documentary.

 

Leave a Reply