Like a Black Rose: An Autobiography of a Dominatrix

January 01, 1970

(AuthorHouse)

 

www.authorhouse.co.uk

 

 

BY ROXANA HADADI

 

Trying to get some soft porn in your life? If so, Like a Black Rose: An Autobiography of a
Dominatrix
is probably for you. If you’re good at using the Internet to
satiate your lust, though, then the book is pretty unnecessary.

 

By Yadi Pearl, a Polish woman living in Vienna who falls into the whole dominatrix
thing after her second divorce, Like a
Black Rose
reads less like an autobiography and more like a series of
disjointed diary entries about a whole slew of uncomfortably erotic situations.
Not for the faint of heart – but not necessarily hardcore, either – the book has
tons of detailed passages about S&M, bondage and faux-rape, but its
plethora of grammatical errors (seriously, it’s infuriating), choppy writing
style and lack of character development make the book more of a pain than a
pleasure (and not, like, sexy pain, either).

 

The book begins by skating over Pearl’s former life, merely
mentioning “divorce proceedings [that] had dragged for more than two years” and
her inability to find a job despite her advanced education (an M.A. in German)
before launching into her reply to an ad seeking “classy, powerful ladies” that
somehow, to the author, does “not sound like an escort service ad or anything
like that.”

 

Then, by the third chapter, Pearl has entered the S&M world, which
she describes as both “a dive into cold unknown water” and a “highly exciting …
unbelievable adventure” … and that’s about all you get. Pearl doesn’t go any further into analyzing
or dissecting her role as a dominatrix and how her double life impacts her
personality or psyche. Instead, she takes up 200 pages with intimate
descriptions about her rendezvous with a blonde female slave (“it smelled of
women everywhere, and I had never before enjoyed it this way”), her first
experience being dominated (“I was totally powerless and at the mercy of
whatever was happening”) and her attempts at a normal relationship with a man
named Tommy who would later betray her (“I was convinced then that the man at
my side was strong, that he was the one to protect me and make me feel
cherished. … But that was then”). It’s interesting to read at first, but more
than 40 chapters worth of it definitely gets old.

 

But while all of the sex scenes in Like a Black Rose effectively give the reader an idea of what Pearl
does for a living, there’s little description of other parts of her life or
explanations as to why she continues being a dominatrix (aside from the money,
of course). That solid lack of information does nothing to help the reader
develop a sense of who Pearl
actually is, and without that, there’s no reason to care about her life – with
or without the sex.

 

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