Four Tet – There Is Love In You

January 01, 1970

(Domino)

 

 

www.dominorecordco.com    

 

 

Before he swapped sound files with dubstep
heavyweight Burial for their early 2009 Wolf/Moth
Club
single, London’s Kieran Hebden had been a member of revered post-rock
project Fridge, he’d collaborated on a number of occasions with jazz drummer
Steve Reid, remixed everyone from Madvillain to Black Sabbath, issued a
monstrous DJ Kicks contribution, and
took on an opener slot for a Radiohead tour. Not unlike his rapidly
accelerating eleven-year career, Hebden’s output as Four Tet has splintered
across the horizon in a dizzying multitude of musical directions.

 

 

The productions bearing Kieran Hebden’s name
have run the gamut from meditative, acoustic/laptop blends to dayglo-flecked
dance music, and have included all of the eclectic and drum-heavy styles in
between. On his fifth full-length solo album, Hebden explores more of the
refined and understated house and techno that characterizes his 2008 Ringer EP, with a generous bundling of
the organic elements that have so often enriched his work.

 

 

Crackling atmospherics, unrelenting locked
grooves, and layers of immaculately organized, cascading accompaniment – There Is Love In You (out this week on Domino) stirs and sweeps, its loop-centric
tapestries as lively and as affecting as its uncoiling electronic flourishes.
Like much of Ringer, the sensual pre-There Is Love single “Love
Cry” holds fast to Hebden’s affinity for a slow build. Everything repeats
ad nauseum here, but not in the manner that wallpaper-styled minimal techno
does. “Love Cry” springs from a solemn percussive place of dry snares
and zipped-tight hi hats, but it opens up eventually, with the producer pushing
synth bass and a wondrous, disconnected pattern of reverse dial tones just
ahead of its mystifyingly live-sounding drum set. “Circling” is a
less frantic nod at Ringer‘s
“Ribbons”, with arpeggios trickling out of every source possible. It
gets even better toward the end; when stuttering guitar lines curl around
“She Just Likes To Fight”, the track falls thankfully far short of
embodying the aggression intended, even amid all of that kitchen-sink
percussion.

 

 

When the Four Tet-Burial partnership yielded a
striking, much-discussed twelve inch, the
potential for an ongoing project between the two audiofiles garnered ample
speculation. In the meantime, Kieran Hebden serves up melodies and ideas again
on his own that captivate just as easily via There Is Love In You, be those far more decorative and
high-spirited compared to his work alongside Burial. And if there’s a Wolf/Moth Club follow-up in the cards,
it’s likely Hebden will find the time to make it happen. He tends to do that.

 

 

 

Standout Tracks: “Circling,”
“Angel Echoes” DOMINIC
UMILE

 

 

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