Category Archives: Film/DVD

Boy Howdy! Creem Documentary Film Interviews

Director Scott Crawford and writer/co-producer Jaan Uhelszki talk about their documentary on the legendary rock mag. Check out a film teaser as well as an extended trailer following the interview.

BY ROBIN E. COOK

Creem was a zany, larger-than-life rock magazine that could only have emerged in Detroit in the late 1960s. The personalities behind Creem were equally colorful, such as founder Barry Kramer and writers Dave Marsh and Lester Bangs. The magazine’s history is told in Boy Howdy! The Story of Creem, with interviews from former staffers and rock star fans.

The documentary was screened last month in Austin during South by Southwest, and Blurt interviewed the film’s director Scott Crawford and writer/ex-Creem scribe Jaan Uhelszki. (Ed. Note: Crawford, incidentally, originally founded Blurt in 2008, following the demise of his popular music magazine Harp; he subsequently handed off the reins to current owner Stephen Judge to embark upon a career in film. Jaan Uhelszki, in addition to her storied career as a journalist, was a contributor to both publications. I was proud to work with both of them. Don’t miss this film, period.—FM)

OST – Velvet Goldmine (Music From the Original Motion Picture)

Album: Velvet Goldmine (Music From the Original Motion Picture)

Artist: OST

Label: Universal Music Special Markets/Island/MVDaudio

Release Date: April 05, 2019

www.MVDaudio.com

BY MICHAEL TOLAND

Though poorly received when it came out in 1998, director Todd Haynes’ glam rock fantasy Velvet Goldmine has, over time, become a beloved cult classic. Whatever one thinks of the film’s reimagining of the relationship between David Bowie and Iggy Pop, though, the soundtrack is where it’s at. A mix of period cuts and glam rock covers performed by a pair of all-star bands made up of nineties alt.rock luminaries, the songlist is damn near impeccable, even with the absence of any Bowie cuts.

While the original compact disc version has been the perfect companion on many a road trip, MVD’s first-time vinyl reissue couldn’t be any more appropriate. Given the film’s time period and its musical metiere, letting the songs spin on wax (especially when as garishly colored as this half-blue/half-orange version) just fits. Needle in groove lets Teenage Fanclub & Elastica’s Donna Mathews’ version of the New York Dolls’ “Personality Crisis,” the Stooges’ “T.V. Eye” by the Wylde Rattz (AKA co-star Ewan McGregor fronting Ron Asheton, Thurston Moore, Don Fleming and others), and Placebo’s take on T. Rex’s “20th Century Boy” leap out of the speakers, teeth bared and power chords aflame. The less raging tracks fare just as well, especially the majestic interpretation of Steve Harley’s “Tumbling Down” from star Jonathan Rhys Meyers and the plethora of Roxy Music tunes (“2HB,” “Ladytron,” “Bitter’s End,” “Bitter-Sweet”) performed by the Venus in Furs, AKA Thom Yorke, Jonny Greenwood, Bernard Butler, Andy MacKay, and producer Paul Kimble. (For some reason Meyers’ take on Harley’s bizarre but affecting “Sebastian” didn’t make the cut on album.)

Speaking of Kimble, Grant Lee Buffalo, the band for whom Kimble played bass at the time, appears with an original: the pitch-perfect “The Whole Shebang,” which manages to sound period and just like its parent’s work at the same time. Ditto the two originals contributed by Shudder to Think, who ease back on their usual avant-garde weirdness to explore the diva-esque glam rock heart of their music with “Hot One” and “Ballad of Maxwell Demon.” Some actual vintage tunes appear as well: the real Roxy Music’s classic “Virginia Plain,” Lou Reed’s gorgeous “Satellite of Love,” T. Rex’s quirky “Diamond Meadows,” Brian Eno’s romping “Needle in the Camel’s Eye” (which runs over the opening credits in the movie) and, closing the LP, Harley’s breezy “Make Me Smile (Come Up and See Me)” – quite possibly a lot of American glam fans’ introduction to this quirky British artist.

As both a sampler and a celebration of the seventies glam rock era, the Velvet Goldmine soundtrack is a gem. That it’s now out in the format that seems most natural to its era makes it gleam all the brighter.

DOWNLOAD: “Hot One,” “The Whole Shebang,” “Tumbling Down”

 

Watch Film Trailer for Upcoming Mojo Nixon Documentary

As we have said many times in the past, sometimes the news just writes itself, and we don’t need to add superfluous commentary…. Above photo by Kent Thompson, taken at a show during the ’80s at Charlotte’s Milestone Club that I also covered for some music magazine back in the day.

By Fred Mills

Yes indeed, the rumors are true: 2020 will bring a rock doc on the inimitable Mojo Nixon, indie rock hero, Tipper Gore scourge. (For a fun BLURT read involving Mojo, go HERE.) The long-overdue “The Mojo Manifesto”  is reportedly now-due from one Freedom Records & Films, and to cement that accusation, er, assertion, there is an official trailer.

Check it out:

Watch Trailer for ’70s Hippie Film “Magic Music Movie”

Flashback time – if you can remember the ’70s, you probably weren’t really there.

By Fred Mills

As Billboard so succinctly puts it – “An Elusive ’70s Band Reunites for One Last Jam in ’40 Years in the Making: The Magic Music Movie’

Indeed, the Magic Music band was a celebrated proto-jam/cosmic folk band out of Boulder back in the day that was tipped to be the next big thing. Until they weren’t, that is, and they eventually split up in 1975 with no albums recorded. So Emmy nominated producer Lee Aronosohn (Big Bang Theory) somehow got it in his head that he wanted to make a documentary about the group, and after tracking down the original members, he even engineered a reunion concert that he was able to film for doc.

 

It’s since been screened at a number of film festivals – including the Boulder Film Festival, natch, and will start opening at very select theaters starting this weekend. Then in early September it will be released digitally via The Orchard. Below, check out the official movie trailer.

LURE/KRAMER/STINSON/BURKE – L.A.M.F. Live at the Bowery Electric

January 01, 1970

www.mvdb2b.com

The Upshot: Walter Lure and company blast through Johnny Thunders’ legacy with a ramshackle joie de vivre that’s more about feel and soul than precision — just like the work of the man to whom it pays tribute.

BY MICHAEL TOLAND

L.A.M.F., the only studio album by Johnny Thunders’ infamous New Yawk punk ‘n’ roll band the Heartbreakers, turned 40 in 2017, outlasting its driving force by a good quarter of a century, Thunders, a notorious junkie, having passed away in ’91 in New Orleans. In anticipatory celebration, Heartbreakers co-guitarist and torchbearer Walter Lure assembled a dream team of Thunders cohorts and acolytes to perform the album front-to-back in its original Track Records 1977 order for a week-long residency in mid-November 1016 at the Bowery Electric venue, recording the shows for a proposed album and video. (For a detailed review of the event, along with the Heartbreakers’ backstory, check out journalist/photographer Caryn Rose’s account at Noisey.)

Joined by MC5 guitarist Wayne Kramer (who played with Thunders in the short-lived Gang War), Blondie/Plimsouls drummer Clem Burke (who came up on the same downtown NYC scene as Thunders) and erstwhile Replacements/Guns ‘N Roses bassist Tommy Stinson (the ‘Mats being one of the few American bands to keep Thunders’ reckless rock ‘n’ roll spirit burning), plus guests, Lure delivers exactly the kind of rock show you’d expect from someone who came up that close to the flame.

The quartet plays like they rehearsed just enough to be on the same page with the songs, but not enough to be anything close to slick. Lure and Stinson share the vocals, with the former keeping to NYC cool and the latter bawling like an out-of-breath animal, while Lure and Kramer faithfully reproduce the original LP’s clashing six-string chaos and Burke calmly makes the case for being the best rock ‘n’ roll drummer alive. The ad hoc band acquits itself nicely on the usual classics like “Chinese Rocks” and “Born to Lose,” with Kramer singing “Let Go” and Burke doing Jerry Nolan’s “Can’t Keep My Eyes On You.” D Generation’s Jesse Malin guests on a feral “I Wanna Be Loved” and a poignant “It’s Not Enough”; Cheetah Chrome romps through “Goin’ Steady”; up-and-coming New York rocker Liza Colby brings soul to “I Love You”; and Chrome and Malin team up on a blazing “Pirate Love.” The whole thing comes clanging to a close with a Kramer-sung “Do You Love Me,” the Heartbreakers’ roaring bash through a Motown classic.

Production values are catch as catch can, with frequent out-of-focus video, a squirrelly mix that favors volume over nuance, a director clearly flying by the seat of his pants, especially in the editing room, and no effort put into maintaining continuity between the three different performances captured in order to compile the film. It makes one wonder if the decision to shoot it was last minute. But you know what? That’s all fine, even appropriate. Johnny Thunders never chased perfection when he could nail the moment, and Lure and company blast through his legacy with a ramshackle joie de vivre that’s more about feel and soul than precision — just like the work of the man to whom it pays tribute.

STILL LIKE A MOTHERFUCKER: The Heartbreakers’ Classic LP, Revived

As released on DVD and LP to chronicle a series of 2016 concerts, and more recently celebrated on a 2017 mini-tour, the iconic punk album proves its staying power.

BY MICHAEL TOLAND

L.A.M.F., the only studio album by Johnny Thunders’ infamous New Yawk punk ‘n’ roll band the Heartbreakers, turned 40 in 2017, outlasting its driving force by a good quarter of a century, Thunders, a notorious junkie, having passed away in ’91 in New Orleans. In anticipatory celebration, Heartbreakers co-guitarist and torchbearer Walter Lure assembled a dream team of Thunders cohorts and acolytes to perform the album front-to-back in its original Track Records 1977 order for a short residency in mid-November 2016 at the Bowery Electric venue, recording the shows for a proposed album and video. (For a detailed review of the event, along with the Heartbreakers’ backstory, check out journalist/photographer Caryn Rose’s account at Noisey.) The video rendering recently arrived on DVD courtesy Jungle/MVD.

 

Joined by MC5 guitarist Wayne Kramer (who played with Thunders in the short-lived Gang War), Blondie/Plimsouls drummer Clem Burke (who came up on the same downtown NYC scene as Thunders) and erstwhile Replacements/Guns ‘N Roses bassist Tommy Stinson (the ‘Mats being one of the few American bands to keep Thunders’ reckless rock ‘n’ roll spirit burning), plus guests, Lure delivers exactly the kind of rock show you’d expect from someone who came up that close to the flame.

The quartet plays like they rehearsed just enough to be on the same page with the songs, but not enough to be anything close to slick. Lure and Stinson share the vocals, with the former keeping to NYC cool and the latter bawling like an out-of-breath animal, while Lure and Kramer faithfully reproduce the original LP’s clashing six-string chaos and Burke calmly makes the case for being the best rock ‘n’ roll drummer alive. The ad hoc band acquits itself nicely on the usual classics like “Chinese Rocks” and “Born to Lose,” with Kramer singing “Let Go” and Burke doing Jerry Nolan’s “Can’t Keep My Eyes On You.” D Generation’s Jesse Malin guests on a feral “I Wanna Be Loved” and a poignant “It’s Not Enough”; Cheetah Chrome romps through “Goin’ Steady”; up-and-coming New York rocker Liza Colby brings soul to “I Love You”; and Chrome and Malin team up on a blazing “Pirate Love.” The whole thing comes clanging to a close with a Kramer-sung “Do You Love Me,” the Heartbreakers’ roaring bash through a Motown classic.

Production values are catch as catch can, with frequent out-of-focus video, a squirrelly mix that favors volume over nuance, a director clearly flying by the seat of his pants, especially in the editing room, and no effort put into maintaining continuity between the three different performances captured in order to compile the film. It makes one wonder if the decision to shoot it was last minute. But you know what? That’s all fine, even appropriate. Johnny Thunders never chased perfection when he could nail the moment, and Lure and company blast through his legacy with a ramshackle joie de vivre that’s more about feel and soul than precision — just like the work of the man to whom it pays tribute.

EDITOR’S NOTE: L.A.M.F. Live at the Bowery Electric has also been released as a limited edition (950 copies pressed), colored vinyl collectible, arriving in independent record stores for the annual Record Store Day “Black Friday” event. (The LP appears to not be listed on the Record Store Day website for that Black Friday sale, originally billed as a “RSD Limited Run/Regional Focus Release; but the BLURT braintrust eagerly snapped up copies on Black Friday, and as of this writing it appears to be available online but with only 950 copies in circulation, it probably won’t remain that way for long.)

And bringing things up to the present, the real 40th anniversary-of-L.A.M.F. was celebrated this past November 29 and 30, also at the Bowery Electric, followed by shows in Brooklyn, Los Angeles, Solana Beach, and San Francisco, where they wrapped on Dec. 4. The mini-tour featured a slightly different roster of players. Lure, obviously, headed things up, and fellow ground-zero punk Burke was also on hand; they were joined by Mike Ness of Social Distortion on guitar, and Sex Pistols/Rich Kids bassist Glen Matlock. Malin again was a special guest, having helped organize both the 2016 and 2017 shows, turning in spirited vocals on “Pirate Love,” “It’s Not Enough,” and — in the Thunders-centric four-song encore — the iconic “You Can’t Put Your Arms Around a Memory.”

Memories, indeed.

 

MOVIE THOUGHTS: Top 10 Films of 2017

BY DANIEL MATTI / BLURT FILM EDITOR

(Go HERE to view the Blurt Movie Thoughts master page, which has links to all previous installments.)

***

  1. The Disaster Artist

From my love of a “behind the scenes” movie to my actual love of Tommy Wiseau’s 2001 The Room, The Disaster Artist continues to just be the one film that replays over and over in my head. Throughout the whole movie I had transcended into actually feeling like I was on set of The Room through James Franco’s Tommy Wieseau’s impression, alongside the huge cast of amazing actors and actresses that included Dave Franco, Seth Rogen, Ari Graynor, and Zac Efron. If you have not seen it because you are timid about James Franco making fun of it, or if you are just unfamiliar with it in general, I suggest taking a breath, watching The Room with a group of friends, and then watching The Disaster Artist.

 

  1. Good Time

This still has to be one of my favorite crime movies in quite a while. From one of the best scores of the year, by Oneohtrix Point Never, to the dark ‘80s vibe that has me anxious to see what the Safdie Brothers are gonna do next. What are they doing next? A remake of 48 Hours. Which has me very, very excited.

Read the rest of my thoughts here: https://blurtonline.com/2017/09/daniel-matti-movie-thoughts-three-new-film-reviews-2-0/

 

  1. The Killing of a Sacred Deer

Yorgos Lanthimos likes to make movies that will linger in your head for a very long time. I don’t think in all of 2017 I have seen a movie quite like this. Pretty sure I’ve never seen a movie like this ever.

Read the rest of my thoughts here: https://blurtonline.com/2017/12/daniel-matti-movie-thoughts-three-new-film-reviews-4-0/

 

  1. Raw

Seeing Raw without having any idea of what you are about to get yourself into is probably the best way to go into seeing it for maximum sense overload and an overall mind-blowing experience from director Julia Ducournau. Raw ends up being one of the most original cannibal stories in quite some time. Garance Marillier plays Justine, a devout vegetarian who just entered her first year of veterinarian school alongside her sister, Alexia, played by the wonderful Ella Rumpf. She enters a rough college world—from twisted hazing to her finding out who she really is—which is something really pro-founding. With cinematography overtones of Dario Argento, this is definitely a must-watch for any horror movie connoisseur.

 

  1. I, Tonya

This was one of the most spectacular surprises I had all 2017—from being unsure of seeing a movie I knew about from seeing on the news at a very young age and not caring then, to being completely spellbound by Margot Robbie’s portrayal of Tonya Harding and the story that covers not just “The Incident” but her life before and after. I can only hope that Robbie ends up taking the “Best Actress” award at this years Oscars.

 

 

  1. Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets

Unfortunately, I can see Valerian not making a lot of lists this year, but I had one of the best times at the theater seeing it. Hopefully after it hits the streaming services and physical copies are released, it will come back around and get the praise it deserves.

Read the rest of my thoughts here: https://blurtonline.com/2017/08/daniel-matti-movie-thoughts-three-new-film-reviews/

 

  1. Get Out

By far, one of the most multidimensional movies of the year was directed by Jordan Peele. Get Out was marketed as a horror movie where many thought it was not a horror movie. Whatever you thought the film brought to you, you can’t deny it being one of the best of 2017. Being that it’s Jordan Peele’s directorial debut is impressive and definitely has solidified for him a promising career in film.

 

  1. Brigsby Bear

One of the year’s most underrated movies was a small film done by a group of the Saturday Night Live current and past crew. Written and staring Kyle Mooney and produced by the Lonely Island (Akiva Schaffer, Andy Samberg, Jorma Taccone) comedy trio, Brigsby Bear takes you on an ‘80s trip that has dark overtones of 2015’s Lenny Abrahamson-directed Room. Which is a confusing sentence to read if you do read that right: Lonely Island comedy mixed with Room. From the cast that also includes Mark Hamill, Claire Danes, and Greg Kinnear, it’s one that people should definitely check out.

 

  1. Colossal

From the new distribution company, Neon, came its first film of 2017 that casts a giant shadow into what the distribution company can bring to the table (the second movie they released this year is I, Tonya). Starring Anne Hathaway and Jason Sudeikis, Colossal is a comedic love story blended with giant monster movie vibes. Overall, just a solid movie that leaves you satisfied.

 

  1. The Big Sick

Kumail Nanjiani and Emily Gordon put the story of the entire relationship out on screen this year and it ended up being one of the most romantic movies of the year. From one of my favorite directors, Michael Showalter, to some of my favorite actors and actresses, The Big Sick will be hailed as one of the classic movies from the year of 2017 when we look back from years to come.

 

 

TRAGICALLY HIP – Long Time Running

Title: Long Time Running

Director: n/a

Release Date: December 01, 2017

www.eaglevision.com

The Upshot: A most fitting tribute to the Canadian stars – and a most fitting goodbye to their charismatic frontman.

BY JOHN B. MOORE

The Tragically Hip were most definitely a Canadian band. Despite some strong pockets of fervent fans in the U.S. and elsewhere across the globe, over the border up north they were U2, Springsteen, Petty and the Rolling Stones all rolled into one.

That diehard, decades-long devotion to the band can be seen throughout Long Time Running (95 mins; Eagle Vision), an emotional documentary focusing on The Tragically Hip’s farewell tour. With singer Gord Downie diagnosed with incurable brain cancer, the Ontario-based group decided to give their devotees a proper goodbye in the form of a 15-date cross-Canada run of shows in 2016. The film intersperses performance shots with fan testimonials and interviews with the band and Downie’s doctors.

After diagnosis, it was not clear that the band could perform again, with treatment causing Downie to forget most of the lyrics to their songs, but the singer that eventually took the stage month later seems to be in prime form, with the audience helping by singing along to every single song.

Even if you’ve never heard a minute of the Tragically Hip, there is still plenty to enjoy about Long Time Running. Emotional without being exploitive and appreciative without drifting into overt fawning over the subject, the directors did a commendable job of bringing to life a story about a band saying goodbye on its own terms

 

Daniel Matti: Movie Thoughts – Three New Film Reviews 4.0

Reviews of Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri (by Martin McDonagh), The Killing of a Sacred Deer (by Yorgos Lanthimos), and Creep 2 (by Mark Duplass and friends).

BY DANIEL MATTI / BLURT FILM EDITOR

(Go HERE to view the Blurt Movie Thoughts master page, which has links to all previous installments.)

***

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

4 out of 5 stars

With a movie title like that, you figured it would be a movie that would be hard to remember but after leaving the film, Three Billboards will be stuck in your head for a while. From the hilariously dark mind of Martin McDonagh (In Bruges and Seven Psychopaths) comes his newest film, and he doesn’t stray away from his normal style of filmmaking—movies that are filled with vivid characters who come to the screen to do damage in numbers. Here, the cast includes Francis McDormand, Woody Harrelson, Sam Rockwell, John Hawkes, and Peter Dinklage.

Mildred Hayes (McDormand) who is a recently-divorced, still-grieving mother over the death of her daughter who was raped then brutally murdered, rents out three billboards seven months after the murder, all located within a few feet of her house and on a road not many travel down. The billboard read, in order, “Raped while dying”—“And still no arrests”—“How come, Chief Willoughby?”

Chief Willoughby (Harrelson) and racist officer Jason Dixon (Rockwell) are notified about the billboards, which brings on a series of events to try to figure out who killed Mildred’s daughter.

With a topic such a rape and murder you would think that you would not be ready for a movie filled with belly laughs, but here, it is quite the opposite. Martin McDonagh movies have characters who are as evil and conniving as they are laughable (either at or along with).

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri was initially out in select cities, but distribution was subsequently expanded and it is currently in most markets.

***


The Killing of a Sacred Deer

5 out of 5 stars

From the warped mind of Yorgos Lanthimos (The Lobster, Dogtooth) comes his latest, amazing, but yet hard to stomach movie. Now, when I say hard to stomach you can take that in two ways. As in, this movie is shit, or this movie has a couple scenes that will make you cringe in your chair. This movie will definitely make you cringe in your chair.

Starring in the film is Colin Farrell as Steven Murphy, a cardiothoracic surgeon who befriends Martin (Barry Keoghan), a grieving young teenage boy whose father was lost on the operating table years ago when Steven performed surgery on him. Martin comes over for dinner and befriends the rest of the family, which includes Nicole Kidman as Steven’s wife, Anna, along with their children Bob and Kim (played by Sunny Suljic and Raffey Cassidy).

Martin tries to repay the favor by asking Steven over to his house for dinner. He obliges, but then later, Martin’s mother makes sexual advances towards him, making him uncomfortable and eager to leave. Martin then tracks down Steven at the hospital where he works to let him know that he has placed a curse on Steven and that he must choose one of the members of his own family. As the curse moves forwards—including paralyzing Bob and Kim along with making them not eat—tension is built through the movie via a free-jazz style soundtrack that puts a cold sweat on the back of the viewer’s neck, leaving you anxious to have some resolution in the near future.

With dizzying camerawork and a stunning acting from the whole crew, this is one that will go on to make it into this year’s top 10 movies.

***

Creep 2

4 out of 5 stars

Found footage horror movies are something that filmmakers either hate deeply or love immensely. From The Blair Witch Project to V/H/S to Paranormal Activity, there have been some that rule the genre as well as those you can instantly forget came out.

From Mark Duplass (The League, Creep, and a lot of other amazing projects), Patrick Brice (Creep, The Overnight), and Jason Blum (CEO of Blumhouse Productions) comes the sequel to 2014’s Creep, a movie that you might have watched on Netflix in the wee hours of the night as you searched for something unique to watch. If you haven’t yet, make sure to go watch Creep now before you read anymore. It’s definitely worth watching.

Here, Sara is a videographer/blogger who has a YouTube series titled “Encounters” where she meets eccentric characters, ranging from people who like to cuddle to some who just want them to be in a hot tub with. From her not knowing what to do next and thinking of ending her series, Sara finds an ad where somebody has offered to $1,000 to film them for an entire day. Who that person is, Sara will then go on to figure out that is none other than, Aaron (Duplass), aka “Peach Fuzz.”

If you remember the first Creep then you might have had the same horrible dream of the character “Peach Fuzz” and how Mark Duplass can play a delightful, but yet sinister and terrifying murderer.

Aaron reveals to her that he is a depressed killer who feels like he is losing his momentum and passion, then invites Sara along for the ride that she definitely was not expecting. Sara soon goes toe-to-toe with Aaron via games and trying to be ahead of the curve as she documents her day with the murderer.

If you’re looking for something that will make you squirm, laugh, and say “what the fuck” out loud a lot, make sure you watch Creep 2, but only if you’ve seen Creep first.

 

 

ARCADE FIRE – The Reflektor Tapes: A Film By Kahil Joseph

Title: ARCADE FIRE - The Reflektor Tapes

Director: Kahil Joseph

Release Date: February 24, 2017

www.eagle-rock.com

BY LEE ZIMMERMAN

Those only vaguely familiar with Arcade Fire and their proficiency for staying several steps ahead of the musical curve may not find further insight in this daring two disc documentary meant to showcase the band in concert and commentary.

Shot partially in black and white before segueing into color, the rapid scene switching, disjointed imaging, and schizophrenic cinematic set-ups all reinforce the unusual nature of their quirky indie pedigree. That leads less to accessibility and more towards a sense of general mayhem. As a backstage document it offers some opportunity for band members to speak candidly about the music and their involvement with the band, but the rapid shift from scene to scene compels the viewer to lean in order absorb all the sights and sounds. Disc two makes much more sense from a musical perspective, in that captures a complete concert and allows a continuous thread of music rather than simply a series of strange scenes that reflect an extreme psychedelic sensibility.

Given a sound that often verges on cosmic cacophony, that’s appropriate, but viewers might be best advised to become familiar the band’s song selection before subjecting themselves to a total sensory assault.