Report: Still Corners Live in Portland

 

At
Mississippi Studios on Nov. 2 it was an indierock fest but still a mixed bag,
featuring sets from Ganglians and England’s Still Corners.

 

By Tim Hinely

The place looked empty when Ganglians played, but my
friends and I were on the other side of the bar so we might as well have been
standing outside. Ganglians trippy pop sound wasn’t necessarily bad, but didn’t
pique my interest enough to head on in.

 

By the time U.K.’s Still Corners came on stage, the
place was still fairly empty, but slowly started filling up. I had heard a few
early singles that I really liked, but their debut full-length for Sub Pop, Creatures of an Hour, didn’t hit me the
way I wanted it to. Still, I was real anxious to see how and what they would
deliver on stage.

 

They launched into their haunting , eerie, ethereal
tunes with a backdrop of oddball videos playing behind them. Vocalist Tessa had
a small Korg keyboard that she occasionally played while the bassist to her
left did most of the keyboard-manning in between (or sometimes while) thumping
out the bass. The guitarist did a fine job of coaxing out otherworldly riffs
and the drummer kept a solid beat. They played several tunes off of said record
including two of my favorites, “Cuckoo” and “Endless Summer” and saved their
Springsteen cover of “I’m On Fire” for mid set.

 

The set ended without much fanfare and they played
no encores; still, something struck me about their performance so much that I
had a hard time taking the cd out of my player for the following week.
Something had crept in there and I’m not sure what it was. Meanwhile, after the
set my friends both said that while they didn’t dislike it, they were depressed.
When I asked why, they said they both had thought about Broadcast, the late UK
band which ended last year when vocalist Trish Keenan passed away due to
complications from pneumonia. Still Corners had reminded them so much of
Broadcast’s dark, brooding sound that it elicited feeling of depression in
them. Once again, the unholy power of music works its mojo and then some. An
odd evening, for sure.

 

 

 

Leave a Reply