Larry Marion, ed.

(It Books/Harper Collins)

 

www.youritlist.com

 

BY FRED MILLS

 

In life, there are four certainties – birth, death, taxes,
and the publications of yet more books on the Beatles, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix,
Led Zeppelin, and the Rolling Stones. It’s not even no-brainer territory for
book publishers; given the ongoing public fascination with the subjects, and
the generational renewal of same as young kids smitten by rock ‘n’ roll come of
age, it’s as much an inevitability as another volume devoted to John F.
Kennedy.

 

Not, as a great philosopher once put it, that there’s
anything wrong with that.

 

So if you are the type to have a sagging music bookshelf
roughly in the vicinity of the “R”s, you most definitely need to investigate The Lost Rolling Stones Photographs: The Bob
Bonis Archive, 1964-1966
. Edited by Larry Marion, a music memorabilia
expert who penned the preface and intro (drummer Charlie Watts also contributed
a foreword), it collects images shot by NYC-based talent agent Bob Bonis during
his tenure in the mid ‘60s as the Rolling Stones’ American tour manager. Bonis,
who passed away in 1992, wasn’t a rock photographer per se, at least not in the sense that we think of shutterbugs such
as Jim Marshall or Henry Diltz. But he was a photography nut who toted his
camera along with him, and he amassed an archive of candid images more as a
hobby than a vocation. (Below: Mick Jagger and Bonis.)

 

 

For Stones fans the trove of photos in this book is manna
indeed; nearly all of the color and b&w shots here have never been before.
Everyone is present, including Mick, Keef, Bill, Charlie and Brian, plus
associates, onstage, in the dressing room, in the recording studio, lounging by
the pool, making vulgar (e.g., the squashed-nosed “nanker”) faces or mooning
the camera, and generally behaving like young, fresh-faced twenty-somethings
having the time of their lives. “Candid” is the operative term, although as
noted there are some concert shots scattered throughout the book, notably a
series of photos from rehearsals for The
T.A.M.I. Show
concert film (Santa Monica, October ’64) that constitute the
only known color shots from that legendary event, as it was filmed in black and
white.

 

 

Bottom line: the 266-page volume will get any
self-respecting Stones fan’s ya-ya’s out, and I’m not necessarily talking about
the page 105 pic of – NSFW alert! – a smirking, unzipped Keith Richards
gripping his cock, bulbous head clearly visible. That photo is titled “Keith’s
Pride.” Paint it black, you devils.

 

A number of Bonis
photographs can be viewed (and purchased as prints) at Larry Marion’s Not Fade
Away Gallery
.

 

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