Tag Archives: frank turner

John B. Moore: Beans on Toast – Interview

Beans on Toast

JBM checking in with his latest column on all things punk, “I Don’t Wanna Grow Up.”

I DON’T WANNA GROW UP / JOHN B. MOORE

By John B. Moore

While not exactly a household name in the U.S. (yet), UK singer/songwriter, punk folk poet Beans on Toast (need any more proof that he’s British?) is about to take on the U.S. Tagging onto Frank Turner’s tour, armed with an acoustic guitar and a tight set list of brilliantly dry witty songs, Beans (given name Jay McAllister) will be playing America for the first time.

He was kind enough to trade some e-mails back and worth talking about his new album Fishing For a Thank You, touring with Turner and being a England’s lone Parrot Head.  


You’ve had Ben Lovett and Frank Turner each produce one of your records. Who produced this one?

It was produced again by musicians Lee (Smith) for the band Middleman and Jamie (Lockhart) from a band called Mye Mi. They have a wicked little studio up in Leeds where everything is recorded to tape.

What can you tell me about Fishing For a Thank You?
It’s my fourth studio album in four years, keeping with my promise of putting out a record on the same date every year (1st December). Last year for the festival season I put together a little band of merry men to help me keep in time with myself. At the end of the summer we went to the studio for a weekend and bashed out the record. So the record has trumpet, accordion and some fine beats.

Do you have any guests on this record?
Yes, Rosie Doonan (a great folk singer from a big musical family), happened to be passing through and sung on the song “Orange.” The song also has a The Zulu Traditional Choir who were rehearsing in the room upstairs so we coaxed them down to finish the record; That and some small interludes from a mate’s five-year-old boy. All of these were by the luck of the draw. Also, Dan who played trumpet in the band also plays trumpet for The Pogues, which is pretty impressive.

When you tour the U.S. next month, will it just be you on the stage or will you bring along a full band?
After the record was recorded I disbanded the band, and am again solo for this year, so I will be solo for the upcoming tour.

You’ll be touring the U.S. with Frank Turner throughout June. Do you know what to expect? Have you ever spent this much time on the road with him?
I’ve spent a lot of time on the road with Frank, from very small early shows to big UK tours and even the Wembley show. So I’d say I know what to expect from Frank’s side, however these will be my first real shows in the U S of A. This, for me, is very exciting mainly because I’m not exactly sure what to expect.

Do you have any musical influences that would surprise people?
Probably quite a few. It may be worth mentioning that my Dad raised me on Jimmy Buffett records. Jimmy Buffett is pretty much unknown over here but I know it’s the opposite over there. Would it be a surprise that I’d say I’m a bit of a parrot head? I’m pretty varied in musical taste, though, and like to sample everything going down.

What’s next for you?
In a nutshell: USA / Festivals / Studio / Tour / Release album / Tour / Repeat….

Those are all the questions I have. Anything else you want to mention?
Not really, mate. If you’re happy then so am I.

***

John B. Moorecan be found at : Blurt/New Music Magazine/InSite Atlanta Magazine (Music Editor)/Innocent Words/NeuFutur Magazine. Follow him on Twitter at his handle @Jbmoore00

 

John B. Moore: Frank Turner – Interview

Frank Turner

 

Longtime Blurt Blogger John B. Moore checks in with his latest column on all things punk, “I Don’t Wanna Grow Up.”

By John B. Moore

It’s been about almost a decade since English punk Frank Tuner walked away from life in a hardcore band and swapped out the distorted guitars for an acoustic one.

In that time he’s turned in an impressive collection of albums, packed Wembley Arena, served as opening act for the London Olympics, and managed to help define the punk rock singer/songwriter genre. He’s known best for his injection of wit and humility into songs about growing up, growing old and politics, and even with an acoustic guitar, you still can’t hide the punk kid inside. Need proof? Listen to “Thatcher Fucked the Kids”—which, in light of The Iron Lady’s demise this week, seems uncanny in its anti-revisionist timeliness.

On the eve of releasing his latest album, Tape Deck Heart (due April 23), and first for Interscope Records, Turner spoke briefly about the label change, playing the opening ceremonies at the London Olympics and future plans with his hardcore side project Möngöl Hörd.(Below, check out “Recovery” from the new record.)

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First off, congrats on signing with Interscope. How did that come about?

In basic terms, they asked, (laughs). The opportunity was there for me to think about working with a different label in the USA, and Interscope seemed like the best place for me. They’re a great label.

When I last interviewed you England Keep My Bones was just coming out and you were going on your first tour with a full band. Has that changed the way you play at all having that full sound?

Well, it alters the live show, sure – actually I’ve been touring with a full band since 2007, on and off. It’s a bigger sound for the live show; it’s very much where my head is at right now musically. The line-up of the band is set. The Sleeping Souls are my guys.

You also played Wembley since we last talked. What was that experience like?

It was amazing, everything went to plan! It was a show that my team and I worked on very hard for a long time. It was also something of a risk – I wasn’t at all sure that I’d sell all the tickets, or that the music I make would work in that kind of live context. In the event it all went swimmingly.

Had you had a chance to meet Billy Bragg before asking him to play that show with you?

Yeah I’ve known Billy and played with him for a few years now. Great guy.

You also had the opportunity to play before the Olympics. Are you surprised by how many people can relate to your songs?

Yes, pleasantly so. The Olympics thing was pretty surreal. I mean, it was an amazing opportunity and a unique experience for sure, but it was certainly outside my comfort zone.

What can you tell me about the new album?

I’m very pleased with it; I think it’s a step up for me, musically and lyrically. The music is a little bigger, warmer, than before. Lyrically it’s a very raw, personal record.

What are your U.S. tour plans?

I’ll be in the USA a whole lot this year and next, (laughs). The Interscope team have big plans for my diary.

Do you have plans to do more with your side project Möngöl Hörd? Release an album maybe?

Yeah I definitely want to get a record together and a tour sometime. It’s a lot of fun, but the problem is that it’s not a main priority for me right now. It definitely has to sit back a bit while we work on Tape Deck Heart.

***

John B. Moorecan be found at : Blurt/New Music Magazine/InSite Atlanta Magazine (Music Editor)/Innocent Words/NeuFutur Magazine. Follow him on Twitter at his handle @Jbmoore00