Tina Dico – A Beginning A Detour An Open Ending

January 01, 1970

(Finest Gramophone)

www.defendmusic.com

Like Joni Mitchell, a notable influence early in her career,
Tina Dico has proven that she’s as astute a poet as she is a singer and
songwriter. While previous efforts have emphasized
her role as a pop pundit of sorts, her latest effort – a tidy box set boasting
three EPs – reflects the more thoughtful side to this Danish songstress, and
offer momentary pause in anticipation of her next album.

In the liner notes to the attractive booklet included in the
box, Dico notes that these EPs were originally for distribution at her
shows. Those plans changed as she grew
more enamored with the material, leading her to package the discs together and
release the songs en masse. Surprisingly,
it holds together quite well, a series of cloudy, contemplative narratives that
inhabit a realm midway between darkness and desire. Dico’s lyrics often flow like freeform
poetry, at times seemingly oblivious of the melodies. Yet like these lines from “London,” they evoke a vivid imagery and
sensuality:

“I’m flying over London on a cold November night
The river snakes across the vast ocean of electric lights,
Fast and weightless like this marvel in the sky,
The young and restless skateboard in the dark beneath the closing London eye.”

That said, many of these musings tend to be mired in
melancholia – as personified by the gentle ode to a lover burdened by the past as
illuminated in “Glow” or the troubling reunion detailed with a “Friend in a Bar.”
Yet even though the songs are sparse and eerily atmospheric, the mood is more
about reflection than remorse. Flush
with intimate details, songs such as “All I See,” “Magic,” “Quarter to Forever”
and “An Open Ending” seem spawned from personal circumstance, creating a
connection that’s all the more affecting, even in spite of the ethereal
ambiance. Those qualities make A Beginning A Detour An Open Ending a unique
journey and one well worth savoring.

Standout
Tracks:
“London,” “Friend in a Bar,” “All I See” LEE
ZIMMERMAN

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