LAVENDER FLU—Mow the Glass

Album: Mow The Grass

Artist: Lavender Flu

Label: In The Red

Release Date: July 06, 2018

http://www.intheredrecords.com

The Upshot: Nowhere near as rough and sweaty as frontman Chris Gunn’s Hunches were, or even as noisy as the first Lavender Flu album, but it’s got a dream-soaked inevitability to it that’s pretty damned beautiful.

JENNIFER KELLY

This second full-length from Hunches front man Chris Gunn’s psychedelic garage project meanders beguilingly through hazy garden paths, a bit cleaner and more acoustic than the 30-track Heavy Air, but still engulfed in droning, indefinite hum. Like the earlier Lavender Flu album, Mow the Glass is a sharp departure from the Hunches’ rowdy to the point of unhinged-ness, Stooges-MC5 amped blues punk tradition. Here the NW foursome — Gunn, his brother Lucas, Hunches drummer Ben Spencer and Eat Skull’s Scott Simmons — cleaves closer to the fuzzed transcendentalism of Greg Ashley, Skygreen Leopards, even Beachwood Sparks.

Still even in the most lotus-petal-strewn, hippie gnostic tracks, stabs and shouts of rock protrude. “Follow the Flowers,” a flickery, tambourine-dragging pipe dream rouses itself for a burst of emphatic guitars, a shout of “You must return to me, return to me, return,” before nodding off again. “Dream Cleaner,” does the opposite trick, letting big thick bands of distorted guitar and raucous kit-battering drums dominate, but breaking for a day-dreamy interval.

“Like a Summer Thursday,” the Townes van Zandt cover, is one of two songs that also appeared on the first album. Here, cleaned up and clarified, embellished with liquid country guitar twang, the cut floats like a helium balloon, lingers like a psychedelic sunset. The other cover is folk eccentric Jackson C. Frank’s “Just Like Anything,” opened up from its folk-picked origins with double guitars and wailing “aah aahs” into something wiggy and wild and expansive.

Lavender Flu also returns to “Demons in the Dusk” this time, paring it down so that you can see the muscle in its surging guitars, its clattering, crescendoing rattles of drums. It’s nowhere near as rough and sweaty as the Hunches were, or even as noisy as the first Lavender Flu album, but it’s got a dream-soaked inevitability to it that’s pretty damned beautiful.

DOWNLOAD: “Like a Summer Thursday” “Demons in the Dusk”

 

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