FOREIGN EXPOSURE: Violetta Zironi

The singer-songwriter discusses her new EP, her love of Norah Jones and Francoise Hardy, the cultural differences between Europe and the U.S., and how her Italian roots have informed her craft.

BY ROBIN E. COOK

Italian singer-songwriter Violetta Zironi took the SXSW stage at Stephen F’s Bar, an elegant Austin venue that was an ideal place for her intimate, country-inflected folk-pop. Her new EP, Half Moon Lane, reflects her love for American music (noted below), particularly on songs like “Toast” and “Muddy Fields.” It’s fitting, then, that she finished her set with a rousing cover of the American folk song “Little Liza Jane.” In her interview with Blurt, she shared road trip stories and explained how she blends European and American styles in her music.

 BLURT: I understand at one point you took a road trip throughout the US. Tell me a bit about that.

ZIRONI: Well, it was a couple of years ago. I was changing the direction I was going musically, and I was looking for a new one. Before then, I was still based in Italy, where the market is very different to the rest of the world, I would say. And I had just moved to London, and I thought I wanted to go see where my favorite music came from, because I’m really passionate about folk music and country and blues, Americana. I was looking for my sound as well as a musician. I decided to go see where it came from, and so that’s why we took a road trip. We went to New Orleans and then Nashville, Memphis, Arkansas, Austin.

But the main thing I realized was that I came from a completely different background, which is European. And there was no point in me trying too hard to do something that didn’t belong to me. So that really helped me, finding my sound. Because I still keep that Americana influence that I love, but I really, really embrace my roots, European, Italian, songwriters, sixties. That is a big part of my sound.

Are there any memories that really stood out?

Well, I had the chance to write songs while I was here, in Nashville, for example, even though I didn’t plan anything really. I just met new people and we just decided to write songs together. Especially this Nashville-based songwriter called Joseph LeMay. I remember finding him on a Spotify playlist a year before and becoming a huge fan of him. So I looked him up on Facebook and I just sent him an e-mail, and I said, “Hey, I’m coming to the US in a few months. I’d love to meet you.” He said, “Oh my God, I’ve checked you out. I love your music. Let’s write a song together.” And so we just met up for a song.

Tell me a bit about how you got started as a performer. You mentioned some of the acts you grew up with. Which specific European artists did you listen to?

There’s a big bunch of songwriters from Italy that developed through the Sixties, as in Paolo Conte, Luigi Tenco, even Ennio Morricone, who does all the soundtracks for the spaghetti Western movies. He is Italian, and still he worked internationally. He found a way of doing something that would be very much appreciated all over the world, but an Italian style, I would say. I listened to all these artists. They are really, how do you say, they’re really good with melody. The melody of Italian songwriters, because of the Italian language, it doesn’t allow you to do short and straight bars, where you need a million words to say something in Italian. It’s really a complicated language. Hence why melodies are very articulated and dynamic. Therefore you need good melodies. I keep that factor in writing English.

You mention Ennio Morricone. He also worked American influences into this Italian sound. Like “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.”

Absolutely. I take a lot of inspiration from him. It just became a thing all over the world. The spaghetti Western is a really popular, really famous thing. And it’s Italian. And in Italy, for example, no one realizes that, which is strange.

You mentioned that you lived in London for a while. What was that like?

That was my first home outside of home. So when I moved out of Italy and went to London, I really, really enjoyed it. A really inspirational place to be, full of amazing musicians and songwriters. I wrote a lot of songs there. That used to be my home for the first year when I started traveling a lot. So I have really good memories attached to that place.

And it seems that in Europe it’s just easier to get exposure to different countries and different sounds than it is in the US. Would you agree with that?

I think so, because obviously there’s so many countries. The continent is just as big as the US, so within an hour on the plane, you can get to a completely different country where they speak a completely different language. That is really, really, really humbling for someone who’s looking for inspiration about people, about different places and backgrounds. But obviously in America there’s so many cultures gathered into this huge country, so there are different influences. But yeah, the networking bit is easier, I think, in Europe, because everyone is so close and so different at the same time.

I hear your music and there seems to be an English folk influence as well. Is that an influence on your songwriting?

Yeah, definitely, well, English, British music is a bit part of my background, what I would listen to when I was growing up. It’s just history. The Brits are just amazing at doing music all the time, so yeah, sure.

And as far as singers, which would be the singers who really inspired you?

I’m a big, big fan of Norah Jones. I just love her tone of voice and how she interprets songs. Really simple, really honest, not too virtuoso, like she’s not trying too hard. But really genuine music. It really gets to me. I really love Emmylou Harris. I love her tone of voice. And Francoise Hardy. I really love her simplicity as well in singing. It’s almost like she’s talking rather than singing. Just like she’s chatting to you.

What’s the big difference between performing for European audiences vs. American audiences?

I can’t really say yet, because I haven’t done as many gigs in the US, yet. But so far, the ones I’ve done have been really, really good. The people are so nice and respectful. They’re really interested and sort of charmed by the fact that I’m not from here. So they seem really intrigued. And therefore they pay a lot a lot of attention. And whenever they come up to me after the show, they talk to me, and I understand they really, really listen. And they maybe tell me about details of my stuff that someone else would take for granted. So I really appreciate that.

In Europe it’s also amazing. I love playing in Germany. People love music so much in Germany. They’re so passionate about music. Italy, it’s a strange one, because usually listening to music is something that you do while you’re eating, just like everything else in Italy (laughs). No, I’m joking. But usually, you play over dinner and stuff like that. Again, in Europe, it changes a lot, whether you’re in Germany, Italy, UK, France. Everyone is so different.

Photos credit: Via Violetta Zironi’s Facebook page.

 

 

 

 

 

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