Category Archives: Music World Death

REMEMBERING… Fleetwood Mac’s Bob Welch

With the fifth anniversary of his death arriving this week, we pay tribute to the underrated guitarist.

BY DAVE STEINFELD

When I heard about Bob Welch’s death on June 7th — allegedly from a self-inflicted gunshot wound — I was both sad and shocked. But it went beyond that. First, June 7th happens to be my birthday. Second, I had the pleasure of interviewing Bob more than once. The first time was when I was writing a daily oldies music service for a well-known radio network. After the interview, my boss decided she didn’t want to run a piece on him after all. I challenged her but she was the boss and she won; the piece never ran and we never gave Bob the attention he deserved. It’s been a recurring theme in his career. Frankly, I’ve been appalled at the coverage — or, more accurately, the lack of coverage — of his death. Though he wasn’t a household name, Bob was far from obscure. (Agreed. BLURT published an obituary at the time, but it didn’t seem like many other music outlets took notice. –Ed.)

He was best known, of course, for his tenure with Fleetwood Mac. As a guitarist and singer-songwriter, Bob basically led the band during the first half of the ’70s — after their stint as a blues-rock combo fronted by Peter Green but before they became one of the biggest bands of all time with the addition of Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks. Bob was the first American to join the band, and his song “Future Games” became the title track of their 1971 album (his first with the band). He stayed with them through four more albums in as many years before leaving on good terms and striking out on his own. There’s sometimes a misconception that Bob was ousted and replaced by Buckingham but this wasn’t the case. It’s just ironic that right after he left, Fleetwood Mac became very successful on the basis of their self-titled 1975 disc and then massive two years later with the release of Rumours.

Still, if the Welch years weren’t Fleetwood Mac’s greatest period, they produced some fine moments. The best one may have been “Hypnotized,” a gorgeous, jazz-influenced tune from 1973’s Mystery to Me. “I’ve always been interested in ‘out there’ subjects,” Bob told me, explaining the song’s genesis. “I’d been doing a lot of reading about astral travel and the whole Carlos Castaneda thing. Also, I had a friend from North Carolina who had a very strange experience while riding dirt bikes in the woods. [He] came upon this weird sort of crater — him and about five friends. Right in the middle of the woods! He said it was the weirdest thing they’d ever seen and they immediately got the feeling that they should get out of there. This time-stopped type of feeling. So he told me that story and I sort of incorporated all the images about it into that song.”

Bob seemed somewhat mixed about leaving the Mac when he did. “I wonder sometimes how my life would have been different had I stayed,” he admitted. “I had success on my own but they had quantum success beyond that — which in those days translated into a lot of partying. I think I would have gone off a cliff on my motorcycle [had I stayed]. So in that sense, I’m glad I didn’t. It would [have been] fun to see what would have resulted from my musical input with Stevie and Lindsey. Sometimes I wonder about that. But I don’t have any [other] regrets.”

Bob was incredibly prolific in the decade after he left Fleetwood Mac. Initially, he led a hard-rock trio called Paris and released two albums with them. But what really put him on the map was his 1977 solo debut, French Kiss. Bob always said that French Kiss was a blatant attempt to write hits — and boy, did it work! The disc was a smash, producing three chart singles. The biggest was a remake of his beautiful ballad “Sentimental Lady,” which originally appeared on Fleetwood Mac’s Bare Trees album. The new version featured Mick Fleetwood, Christine McVie and even Buckingham and scored Bob a Top 10 hit. The follow-up, a rocker called “Ebony Eyes,” was nearly as popular.

His sophomore set, Three Hearts, appeared in 1979 during the height of the disco craze. While not as successful as French Kiss, it did more than respectably, spawning a hit with “Precious Love.” He would issue four more solo releases between 1980 and 1983. None produced a hit, which is a bit mystifying considering both his previous track record and the quality of the music. After Eye Contact, his final studio outing for RCA, Bob didn’t release another album until the late 1990s. That disc, Bob Welch Looks at Bop, was a jazz album of all things. By this time, he had been through many ups and downs, musically and personally, and was less interested in trying to write hits than in following his muse.

Around that same time, Fleetwood Mac was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In addition to the band’s classic lineup (Fleetwood, John and Christine McVie, Buckingham and Nicks), all their major guitarists (Peter Green, Danny Kirwan, Jeremy Spencer) were inducted — except Bob Welch. It was a glaring and inexplicable omission and Bob was hurt. That said, it wasn’t as if he hated his former bandmates. When I spoke with him in 2003, the Mac had just released Say You Will, their first album in years. Though it didn’t exactly set the charts on fire, Bob was unequivocal in praising it. “I absolutely love it,” he said. “I think it’s the best thing they’ve done in a long time. Lindsey’s just all over the place [with] layers and textures and stuff. I was knocked out by it.”

We went on to discuss the sad state of commercial radio in the 21st century. “Radio used to be [better] in the days of the AM stations,” he said. “They’d play Dionne Warwick, then they’d play The Beatles, then they’d play the MC5, then they’d play Tony Bennett. I think the fragmentation [of music] has added to the fragmentation and divisiveness of our society. Up until the point where we’ve got — well, you know what we’ve got, being from New York. One side hates the other.” He was right, of course.

RIP, Bob. You were a great guy and a talented, underrated musician who deserved better.

Gregg Allman 1947-2017 R.I.P.; Bandmembers Pay Tribute

An era is truly finished.

By Blurt Staff

And then there were none—Allman brothers, that is. Though the spirit of the Allman Brothers Band will no doubt endure for decades to come, given the influential legacy that the Southern rock legends forged over the years, starting in the late ‘60s/early ‘70s, without the group’s actual namesakes—brothers Duane who passed long ago, and Gregg, who we lost on May 27, just as the Memorial Day weekend was in full swing, it’s unlikely that anyone will be able to lay credible claim to “owning” or “perpetuating” that legacy.

This publication’s editor, Fred Mills, offered a personal remembrance of Gregg and his band of musical brothers upon receiving news of the death, writing, “R.I.P. Gregg Allman. This wasn’t altogether unexpected, but it’s still a shock, like part of my teenage self disappearing. I first saw the band touring behind their second album, in a small Charlotte venue, en route to the career defining Fillmore East album – still quite possibly the greatest concert album ever. Several years ago I got to see him up close and personal at the Warren Haynes Xmas Jam here in AVL, and I will never forget the sight of him backstage down below the Civic Center stage, chilling out in the hospitality area and watching the TV screen with the action onstage. I started to approach him, just his cowboy boots poking out from the big stuffed chair as he stared at the screen, not moving. I realized no one dared interrupt him, as there was no one else in proximity to his seat. I sure wasn’t going to be a fanboy at that moment. It was as if a deity was among us, seated on a throne, imperious but impossibly calm. He’d be onstage in another couple of hours, doing “Midnight Rider” and more…”

The tributes, of course, have been pouring forth following the official announcement of Gregg’s passing, from liver cancer:

Gregory LeNoir Allman
December 8, 1947 – May 27, 2017

It is with deep sadness we announce that Gregg Allman, a founding member of The Allman Brothers Band, passed away peacefully at his home in Savannah, Georgia.

Gregg struggled with many health issues over the past several years. During that time, Gregg considered being on the road playing music with his brothers and solo band for his beloved fans, essential medicine for his soul. Playing music lifted him up and kept him going during the toughest of times. Gregg’s long time manager and close friend, Michael Lehman said, “I have lost a dear friend and the world has lost a brilliant pioneer in music. He was a kind and gentle soul with the best laugh I ever heard. His love for his family and bandmates was passionate as was the love he had for his extraordinary fans. Gregg was an incredible partner and an even better friend. We will all miss him.”

Gregg is survived by his wife, Shannon Allman, his children, Devon, Elijah Blue, Delilah Island Kurtom and Layla Brooklyn Allman; 3 grandchildren, his niece, Galadrielle Allman, lifelong friend Chank Middleton, and a large extended family.  The family will release a statement soon, but for now ask for privacy during this very difficult time.

The family suggests that tributes to Gregg can be made to the Gregg Allman Scholarship Fund at The University of Georgia or the Allman/Lehman Endowed Scholarship at Syracuse University.

Latter-day Allmans guitarist Warren Haynes wrote on Facebook this weekend, “I am truly honored to have been fortunate enough to have written many songs with him and equally honored to have traveled the world with him while making the best music the world has ever known… Traveling – like life – is so much better when you’ve got friends to share the experience with. I’ve lost too many lately and this one is gonna be hard to get past.

“Here was this group of Southern hippies with an integrated band coming out of the Deepest South with equally deep music on the heels of some extremely deep changes. We didn’t realize how heavy that was at the time but we sure realized how heavy the music was… Gregg wrote these amazing songs that were as natural as his voice was. The words and melodies felt so perfectly unpretentious and, when delivered by him, made an emotional connection that only happens when music is genuine and honest. I learned an enormous amount about singing and songwriting from him—most of it before we ever met.”

Keyboard player Chuck Leavell also put his thoughts down to digital paper, posting at his website, “Gregg Allman was not only a friend and brother, but he was a strong inspiration to me very early on in my career…. I was so fortunate to get the call to play on [Gregg’s Laid Back solo album], and as a then 19-year old keyboard player trying to find his way, it was the dream offer of a lifetime. Playing on “Laid Back” was a life changing experience for me, but even more was to come, when the jam sessions after hours with the other members of the ABB resulted in me being asked to join the band.

“Thank you, Gregg…for your inspiration, for your talent, for your loyal friendship and for the amazing human being you are. I am forever grateful for my relationship with you, for sharing the stage with you so many times, for the honor of recording with you on some records that have stood the test of time. You will always be my hero and I am your biggest fan. Rest easy, my Brother.”

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At this stage in the game, what can a media outlet possibly publish that might adequately contextualize the contribution Gregg Allman, along with brother Duane and the rest of the Allmans extended musical family, contributed to rock ‘n’ roll? Their place in the pantheon transcends simple matters of Grammys and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame status—they moved the dial in immeasurable ways.

How to count them? Here’s a modest start…

 

 

Jimmy LaFave 1955-2017 R.I.P.

Austin singer-songwriter was only 61. Watch some incredibly moving live clips, below.

By Fred Mills

Beloved Americana artist Jimmy LaFave passed away earlier this week (May 21) at his home in Austin following a lengthy battle with cancer. He was 61. According to the Austin Chronicle, the illness was “a type of sarcoma that primarily affected his lungs [which] was largely kept secret until recently… Last month, news broke that LaFave’s family had finally engaged hospice care.”

Yet just a few days before his death, LaFave appeared at a sold-out concert at Austin’s Paramount Theatre that featured his music done by Christine Albert, Sarah Lee Guthrie, John Fullbright, Shinyribs, Butch Hancock, and Ruthie Foster, among others. LaFave himself came out for part of the finale in a wheelchair and hooked up to oxygen.

LaFave grew up in Texas, later moving to Oklahoma where he pioneered a regional sound dubbed “red dirt music.” Following a relocation to Austin, he became a prolific songwriter and performer, touring frequently issuing numerous critically acclaimed albums. Among his key influences were Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan (he even put together a touring Guthrie tribute show in 2003).

Anyone who ever saw LaFave in concert came away deeply moved, not only by his inherent tunefulness and ability to conjure lyrical images frequently as vivid as those by his influences, but by the otherworldly aura he projected, one that reassured and brought comfort to the human spirit.

I’ll never forget seeing him live in Tucson and getting to meet him after the show: He seemed humbled by the fans’ adulation and adoration, yet relaxed and genial, ready to engage. Below, watch some choice LaFave clips – including a version of Prince’s “Purple Rain” as well as a somewhat shaky audience recording  fo the Left Banke’s “Walk Away Renee” that still somehow seems… perfectly appropriate. Also included is a clip from one of his final concerts, this past April at Threadgills in Austin, in which he does Dylan’s “You’re Gonna Miss Me When You Go” that reportedlybrought the audience – which knew he only had a little time left – to tears. R.I.P., Jimmy.

Soundgarden’s Chris Cornell 1964-2017 R.I.P.

By Blurt Staff

The Soundgarden and Audioslave vocalist is dead at the age of 52. On Wednesday night, May 17, he took his own life, by hanging. He apparently use an exercise band that he attached to the top of a hotel bathroom door. Soundgarden had performed earlier that evening in Detroit.

Some observers have claimed it was not altogether unexpected, as Cornell had a history of substance abuse and, according to his wife, was on anti-anxiety medicine. His wife, however, further speculated that it might not have been altogether intentional because she had talked to him earlier in the evening and said he sounded “groggy” and indicated he had taken additional anxiety medicine. Cornell’s attorney noted, according to Rolling Stone, “Without the results of toxicology tests, we do not know what was going on with Chris — or if any substances contributed to his demise. Chris, a recovering addict, had a prescription for Ativan and may have taken more Ativan than recommended dosages. The family believes that if Chris took his life, he did not know what he was doing, and that drugs or other substances may have affected his actions…. [side effects of Ativan include] “paranoid or suicidal thoughts, slurred speech and impaired judgment.”

Soundgarden, of course, was one of the premiere acts of the grunge era, along with Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Alice In Chains, and Mudhoney. 1991’s Badmotorfinger remains a defining release from the era. The band was also one of the early acts to appear on Sub Pop Records. He follows in the footsteps of fellow grunge icon Kurt Cobain, who also committed suicide.

Col. Bruce Hampton (Ret.) 1947-2017 R.I.P.

Southern sonic savant found a helluva way to go out.

By Fred Mills

The jamband world —and indeed, most sentient creatures with any affinity for the musical universe — is mourning the death of Col. Bruce Hampton (Ret.) at the age of 70. Hampton was onstage at Atlanta’s Fox Theater last night (May 1) during a live birthday celebration when he apparently dropped to his knees — to some, it appeared to be part of the show — than collapsed while the musicians around him continued to play. Soon, however stage hands rushed out and carried him offstage and an ambulance was called. Hampton reportedly died a short time later. The concert featured Derek Trucks and Susan Tedeschi, Blues Traveler singer John Popper, The Wood Brothers’ Oliver Wood, Widespread Panic’s Dave Schools, Allman Brothers Band’s Chuck Leavell, Peter Buck, Phish’s Jon Fishman, Warren Haynes and actor Billy Bob Thornton.

The exact cause of death has not yet been announced

According to CNN, Haynes, of Gov’t Mule/Allman Brothers/Dead fame, and a close friend of Hampton’s, was playing with the artist at the time, and he subsequently posted to his Facebook page a brief statement from the Hampton camp:

“After collapsing on stage surrounded by his friends, family, fans and the people he loved, Col. Bruce Hampton has passed away. The family is asking for respect and privacy at this difficult time.”

By this morning, social media was crowded with posts from grieving fans and friends, one of whom posted, appropriately enough, “Godspeed and many thanks to one of the leaders/influencers of the jam band movement, Col. Bruce Hampton. What a way to go out.”

BLURT would like to extended our deepest condolences to Hampton’s family. Speaking personally, I was fortunate enough to see him perform numerous times, frequently with the ARU or the Codetalkers — I never caught him in his early days with the Hampton Grease Band, but their lone LP was a twisted favorite of mine as a teenager — and often as a featured guest at the annual Warren Haynes Christmas Jam concert in Asheville, NC. Two of my fondest abiding memories is of hanging with him backstage during a couple of the jams, one time watching him getting a hand massage along with Bob Weir while he and I compared notes on concerts we had potentially attended at the same time while growing up in the South, and another standing in a semicircle with others while he held court, telling jokes and talking baseball. He was a funny, funny guy and a supremely talented musician, a guy who commanded love and respect from any musician who came into his wild, spontaneous orbit.

Guitarist J. Geils 1946-2017 R.I.P.

J Geils

Had been estranged from his former bandmembers for several years.

By Fred Mills

John Warren “J.” Geils Jr. – just call him J. (with the period) has passed away at the age of 71. The Boston blues-rock guitarist lived in Groton, Mass., and he was found yesterday afternoon, April 11, at his home, of not-yet-disclosed causes. The police are investigating but for the time being foul play is not suspected, according to the Boston Globe.

The J. Geils band was a touring mainstay of the ‘70s – yours truly saw them on numerous occasions, and they were a dynamic outfit, particularly with Geils’ potent guitar playing, frontman Peter Wolf’s physicality and harp player Magic Dick’s wild, hirsute, Afro-delic appearance. They began notching hits early on via tracks like “Lookin’ For a Love,” “Give It to Me” and “Must of Got Lost”, and then when MTV entered the picture, they went global thanks to hits “Centerfold” and “Freeze Frame.” (Below: the band during the ‘70s.)

Geils band

The band broke up in the mid ‘80s, subsequently mounting a number of reunions over the years. Unfortunately, Geils left the band he formed in 2012, having become estranged from Wolf over a legal dispute stemming from his having trademarked the band name. Peter Wolf posted a note on Facebook when the news of Geils’ death broke: “’Thinking of all the times we kicked it high and rocked down the house! R.I.P. Jay Geils.”

Corpses Of Folk (Drake, Buckley, Seeger, Harper) LP for RSD 2017!

Corpses of Folk

Hats off to Arlo Guthrie! Previously unreleased album on colored vinyl or cassette only.

By Rob Gordon

Long-rumored, but never confirmed: the one-off collaboration of musical giants that wags once cynically termed “The Corpses Of Folk” has finally been revealed as fact, and it’s headed to stores on April 15 via Scorpio. The label, which earned infamy in the ‘90s as a bootleg label that issued titles by Dylan, Springsteen and other icons, resurfaced earlier this year as a legitimate imprint of a certain Los Angeles-based archival label. It plans to release the project on starburst swirl purple vinyl and cassette for Record Store Day, April 15; a digital and CD releases will follow later in the year.

Corpses Of Folk comprises sessions recorded over (as a press release puts it) “one stoned weekend in Woodstock” in late ’71 and co-produced by Jimmy Page and Arlo Guthrie. The musicians? Bedsit icon Nick Drake, avant-provocateur Tim Buckley, scene godfather Pete Seeger, and reluctant cricketer Roy Harper. The four had convened at the behest of Led Zeppelin’s Page, who’d struck up a friendship with Harper and, after suggesting the off-the-wall summit as a kind of dream date for him, had his manager, Peter Grant, get in touch with the other three.

Grant used his, er, legendary powers of persuasion to land Drake, Buckley and Seeger—apparently the long-standing urban legend of Grant’s bodyguard dangling the sickly Drake outside a window by his ankles until he assented is just that, an urban legend (albeit one convincingly circulated by rap impresario Suge Knight)—and voila, a supergroup was born. Sadly, at the time the four principals’ record companies could not come to a contractual agreement despite Page and Grant’s assurances that their label, Swan Song, which would release the album, would see that everyone was fairly compensated. So the sessions were shelved, until now.

Apparently My Morning Jacket’s Jim James obtained a bootleg CDR of the music and was so entranced that he used his estimable clout to bring the project to contemporary fruition. James receives an executive producer credit on the album (as does Grant, who passed away in 1995 but still commands fear and respect in the industry from the grave), and both James and M. Ward reportedly “sweetened” some of the guitar and backing vocal tracks, but the material is otherwise presented in exactly the form it was recorded.

(Apparently there are a number of outtakes from the sessions that will remain in the vaults, including Harper’s version of the blues standard “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl” and a Harper original provisionally titled “The Chicken Hawk Waltz.”)

Oh, and about that band moniker: While Drake, Buckley and Seeger have passed away and Roy Harper is technically still among the living, the name “Corpses Of Folk” took on fresh cachet in November of 2013 when Harper was charged in England with “unlawful sexual intercourse, indecent assault and gross indecency” regarding allegations about a young girl he’d known between 1975 and 1977. “He’s among the walking dead,” stated a London-based music industry publicist at the time.

However, as Wikipedia notes, “on 5 February 2015 Harper was unanimously acquitted by a jury of indecent assault. The following day, Harper was cleared of a second charge of indecent assault, and the jury at Worcester Crown Court was discharged after failing to reach verdicts on the remaining charges. According to the BBC, the judge Robert Juckes QC then gave the prosecution two weeks to consider whether they wished to seek a re-trial on the undecided charges, but it wasn’t until 9 November 2015 that the prosecution announced that they were dropping all allegations of sexual abuse against Harper.”

It’s widely assumed that the resolution of the Harper controversy is what finally cleared the way for the release of the tapes, but a representative from the Harper camp declined to comment on that count, simply saying, “That’s all in the past.

Go here to listen to the Drake-Buckley duet, “Time Has Told Me to Get On Top,” which is, incidentally, the only track to feature Guthrie. He’s on the part-spoken, part-sung backing vocals.

 

James Cotton 1935-2017 R.I.P.

James Cotton

Blues harp master was one of the last living links to The Blues’ heyday. Above photo: Christopher Durst (via the web).

By Blurt Staff

A giant of classic—and contemporary—blues passed away March 16: James Cotton, harmonica legend, at the age of 81, from pneumonia. Fittingly enough, he died in an Austin hospital while the SXSW musical throngs clogged the clubs in the streets below.

The Delta-spawned bluesman influenced untold players from multiple genres—blues, rock, folk—and aside from the many blues peers he performed with over the years, he also worked with everyone from Led Zeppelin and Eric Clapton to Janis Joplin and Keith Richards. He got his start as a vocalist in the ‘50s, at Sun Records of all places, then wound up as a featured performer with Muddy Waters before starting his own James Cotton Blues Band.

The Washington Post and the New York Times both have key summaries of the man’s career. Meanwhile, check out some of his music, below.

Paying Tribute to Chuck Berry 1926-2017 R.I.P.

Chuck

Knoxville-based musician Tim Lee, of the late, great Windbreakers, more recently of the Tim Lee 3 and Bark (reviewed here, incidentally) wrote this morning at his Facebook page about the enormous influence Chuck Berry had upon him and several generations’ worth of rockers. He says it better than any of us Blurt-ers could possibly say it. Follow Tim on Facebook here.

BY TIM LEE

When I was a kid, I was eat up with guitar (as we say in the South). I watched the bands on Midnight Special and ABC’s In Concert, and I thought there was nothing cooler than a low-slung Gibson or Fender. Still do.

We had an old Kay hollow-body stashed away in a closet that my brother never got around to learning, so I pulled it out one day. My dad was gracious enough to drive me and the guitar over to Skeets McWilliams’ music store in west Jackson, where they put strings on it and replaced the missing bridge.

That thing had scary high action, but it was a guitar. I joined the guitar club at my junior high school (yeah, pretty cool, huh?), where English teacher/musician J.R. Robertson gave us printouts of the chords and words to current songs like “Angie” by the Stones. He brought in different guitars and let us play them, and he lit a fire under some of us that never went out.

J.R. is still one of my parents’ good friends. They don’t hold it against him.

A year or so later, we were living in Brookhaven, Miss. David Bowling was a skinny red-haired neighborhood guy who was a couple years older than me and knew some guitar. He figured out that, if he could show me some bar chords and a few familiar rock and roll riffs, he’d have someone to play rhythm guitar while he worked on his improvising solos skills.

I’d spend hours at his house playing “Jumpin’ Jack Flash,” “Sympathy for the Devil” and “Stormy Monday” (9th chords and all). It was a great education for playing rock n’ roll rhythm guitar.

But David’s favorite was playing “Johnny B. Goode.” He taught me how to play the “runka, runka” rhythm stuff, and I eventually mastered it, no matter how much my pinky protested.

Eventually, he showed me how to play the double-stop intro riff. Torturing my fingers on that damn-near-impossible-to-play Kay through my little solid state Silvertone amp, I thought I’d found Nirvana (obviously the state of being, not the band).

That was it for me. I’d already taken the bait, but the hook was set at that point in time.

From that moment forward, it was hard to drag me away from the guitar. I got a book called “How to Play Lead Guitar” from the Brookhaven library, where I learned a couple scales and a few more “Chuck Berry licks,” as the book referred to them.

Yeah, that’s how important Chuck Berry is to rock n’ roll guitar. That book contained no “George Harrison licks,” no “Bo Diddley licks,” no “B.B. King licks,” and no “Keith Richards licks.” There were just “guitar licks” and “Chuck Berry licks.”

There might have been a few co-authors of the form, but Berry wrote the figurative book on the matter.

The first time I hung out with Bobby Sutliff, he showed me a bunch of less-familiar CB riffs. That had a strong effect on my approach to lead guitar. (Not to stray too far off course, but Bobby really has an encyclopedic knowledge of that stuff. I’ve seen seasoned pros pull him aside so he can show them that killer ascending bit in the “Let it Rock” solo.)

I often joke that my approach to soloing is just Jeff Beck’s solo on “Heart Full of Soul” combined with a handful of Chuck Berry licks, that anything else is just over-achieving. But I’m only half-kidding.

So here’s to Chuck Berry, who was set to release his first record in years at the age of 90. This has been all about his influence on rock n’ roll guitar, but there’s a whole ‘nuther tome that could be written on his contributions to the poetry of the medium.

There won’t be another one like him.

Photo Gallery: Farewell to Jazz Guitarist Larry Coryell, R.I.P.

Laughin'Larry0981

Mega-memorable show from 2012 in Toronto. Above: the virtuoso clearly loved what he did onstage.

By Eric Thom

Jazz innovator and guitar icon Larry Coryell passed away this week, and we here at BLURT have to note the man’s passing as he was an inspiration to us all. Below, some photos of him that I took during a June 2012 performance at Hugh’s Room in Toronto. R.I.P., to a master,,,

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