Monthly Archives: October 2012

Photo Gallery: Moogfest 2012

 

Check out our photos
from the third annual Moogfest, held October 26 & 27 in Asheville, NC.
(Go here to read Jordan Lawrence’s report from the front lines.) Pictured
above: Santigold.

 

Photos by Margaret
Hester
& Jordan Lawrence

 

Death Grips

 

 

Ahleuchatistas

 

 

Shpongle

 

 

Thomas Dolby (also receiving award)

 

 

Outside the Civic Center

 

 

Inside the Civic Center

 

 

 

 

Bear In Heavn

 

 

Carl Craig

 

 

Miike Snow

 

Primus

 

 

Orbital

 

 

 

Inside Thomas Wolfe Auditorium

 

 

 

Pantha Du Prince

 

 

GZA

 

 

Nas

 

 

Explosions in the Sky

 

 

Divine Fits

 

 

Moogfest Costumes!

 

 

 

 

 

Video: New Menahan Street Band

Funk/soul par
excellence for the modern consumer, yo.

 

By Blurt Staff

 

The new Menahan Street Band album – not the least of which
would be the Dunhan/Daptone label
and the prophetic The Crossing title
– drops this week. It’s reviewed in the new print issue of BLURT, hitting
newsstands just about now, so meanwhile, check out the video for “Ivory and
Blue,” featuring artwork by Mike Perry:

 

 

 

 

MSB will also kickoff a national tour 11/13 in Minneapolis. See full tour
itinerary, below. Writes our reviewer, “Essential
MSB reference point: all five MSB members are current and/or former members of
the Dap Kings/Budos Band/Antibalas/El Michaels Affair extended family of modern
soul/funk/afrobeat/hip hop true believers. Overtly
cinematic, The Crossing is all about atmosphere and vibe, and lead MSB
guy Thomas Brenneck has crafted ten seamlessly funky and beautifully played and
arranged instrumental tracks in search of a film… More Isaac Hayes than James
Brown, it beautifully plumbs the beating heart of urban noir.”

 

Mo’ music:

 

“Lights Out” MP3
(stream): http://soundcloud.com/daptone-records/menahan-street-band-lights-out

 

“The Crossing” MP3
(download): http://soundcloud.com/daptone-records/menahan-street-band-the

 

Tour dates:

 

Nov 13 Minneapolis, MN
– 7th Street
Entry

Nov 14 Madison, WI
– High Noon Saloon

Nov 15 Milwaukee, WI
– Mad Planet

Nov 16 Chicago, IL
– Double Door

Nov 17 Cedar
Falls, IA – University of Northern Iowa Performing Arts Center
+

Nov 28 Santa Barbara, CA
– UC Santa Barbara Campbell Hall +

Nov 29 Los Angeles, CA
– UCLA Royce Hall +

Nov 30 San Francisco, CA – Great American
Music Hall +

Dec 01 Davis, CA
– UC Davis +

Dec 03 Arcata, CA – Humboldt State +

Dec 05 Portland, OR – Aladdin
Theater +

Dec 06 – Seattle, WA
– Neumos +

Dec o7 – Bellingham, WA – Wild
Buffalo +

+with Charles
Bradley

 

 

Report: Public Image Ltd. Live Toronto

 

 

At the Opera House
on October 18, Rotten & Co. put on a 2 ½ hour marathon that covered plenty
of ground.

 

Text & Photos by April S. Engram

 

For those who know their punk rock history, Public Image
Ltd. need no introduction. Formed in ’78, disbanded in ’92 and regrouped in
2009, 2012 marked the release of PIL’s first album in 20 years. The ever
formidable lead singer John Lydon (aka Johnny Rotten of Sex Pistols fame),
guitarist/instrumentalist Lu Edmonds (The Damned, The Clash), drummer Bruce
Smith and new recruit bassist Scott Firth are on tour promoting their latest
effort – appropriately titled after such a long absence – This Is PIL. Perhaps fans of the “old” PIL might’ve walked away
from Toronto’s
Opera House disappointed that the band did not play more of the classic hits
(“Public Image” didn’t make the cut); nevertheless, the talented and seasoned musicians
made the House rumble.

 

The band took to the stage and leapt
into ‘80s single, “This Is Not A Love Song,” new track “Deeper Water” and the
10 minute classic, “Albatross.” Older tracks were revamped to fit the new
outfit and though such songs sounded slightly different from their original
recordings, PIL made each number heavier and punchier. With just three
instruments and a computer for the more electronic sounds, PIL created quite a
bit of noise.

 

 

 

Edmonds
proved amazing to watch as he effortlessly created an array of sounds from his
tweaked collection of stringed instruments: guitar, saz and cumbus. Smith
pummeled his drums while Firth created the heavy, bass laden riffs that drown
PIL’s music. Lydon growled, shouted and bellowed the lyrics in a signature style
all his own, and the most avid fans sang along. As the vocalist’s delivery is surely
demanding on his throat, his cure was: drink water, gargle Hennessy and spit
the remnants in a bucket.

 

When done with the first few tracks Lydon finally
addressed the audience which led to shouts of song titles. “What is this,”
Lydon asked us, “are we a fucking wedding band, taking requests?” (The shouting
turned to applause and laughter as Lydon chatted on about the band’s
relationship with the audience – it is indeed like a marriage was the
conclusion.) PIL’s sound is trance inducing; with tracks often in the 6-8
minute mark, most fans stood in place and rocked their body or bopped their
head to the repetitive beats. Lydon wanted more.

 

“What’s that other big city in Canada,”
he began, “Montreal?
They were louder than you!” He facetiously smiled as the audience booed loudly,
but of course this wouldn’t stop Johnny Rotten. “They booed louder than you” he
continued. The concert hall drowned in boos and laughter, “Parlez vous
Francais,” he asked in his laden Brit accent. “We don’t believe in French,” a
girl returned which made Lydon laugh. “Come now,” he finally retorted, “we’re
all one.” Though the concert hall might have been a bit more mellow than
anticipated, the majority of audience enjoyed the high octane show.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the politicized “Religion,” Lydon introduced us to
Jesus, Edmonds
approached the front of the stage for his guitar solo, and Satan, Firth plucked
away on his electric, stand-up bass.  Lydon thanked the crowd then paid
homage to the rest of PIL and his right hand man John Stevens, who stood on the
stage for the performance’s entirety before disappearing with the band
backstage.

 

Their absence was not a long one and PIL returned to
close the night with the loudest number yet, “Open Up.” A song Lydon recorded
with electronic/dance artist Leftfield, 
PIL reworked it into a heavy, bass laden performance that literally
circulated air from the speakers with each thump into the stacks. At the end Lydon
advanced to the edge of the stage, made sure to walk its length, and bowed to
the audience. Nearly 2.5 hours later Public Image Ltd. were done.

 

Setlist:

 

This Is Not a Love Song

Deeper Water

Albatross

One Drop

Flowers of Romance

Disappointed

Warrior

U.S.L.S. 1

Reggie Song

Death Disco

Bags / Chant

Religion

Encore:

Out of The Woods

Rise

Open Up

 

Photos: Yep Roc 15

 

October 10-13, at Cat’s Cradle in Carrboro,NC, it was a celebration par excellence.

All photos by Tony Landa

(above) Nick Lowe performs with Los Straitjackets at Cat’s Cradle – 10/11/12

Eddie Angel of Los Straitjackets at Local 506 for the YR15 Kickoff party – 10/10/12

Rick Miller of Southern Culture on the Skids performs with Yep Roc co-owner Tor Hansen looking on at Local 506 – 10/10/12

Peter Zaremba of The Fleshtones at Local 506 – 10/10/12

Dave Alvin at Cat’s Cradle – 10/11/12

Robyn Hitchcock at Cat’s Cradle – 10/11/12

Nick Lowe at Cat’s Cradle – 10/11/12

Eleni Mandell performing with Los Straitjackets at Cat’s Cradle – 10/11/12

Chuck Prophet performs with Los Straitjackets at Cat’s Cradle – 10/11/12

Danny Amis of Los Straitjackets at Cat’s Cradle – 10/11/12

The Mayflies USA at Cat’s Cradle – 10/12/12

Cheyenne Marie Mize at cat’s Cradle – 10/12/12

Josh Rouse at Cat’s Cradle – 10/12/12

John Wesley Harding hosts Yep Roc 15 at Cat’s Cradle – 10/12/12

Eugene Mirman at Cat’s Cradle – 10/12/12

Sloan at Cat’s Cradle – 10/12/12

Liam Finn at Cat’s Cradle – 10/12/12

Adam Schlesinger of Fountains of Wayne at Cat’s Cradle – 10/12/12

Chris Collingwood of Fountains of Wayne at Cat’s Cradle – 10/12/12

Darren Hanlon at Cat’s Cradle – 10/13/12

Jim White at Cat’s Cradle – 10/13/12

Chatham County Line at Cat’s Cradle – 10/13/12

Tift Merritt at Cat’s Cradle – 10/13/12

The Minus 5 with John Wesley Harding at Cat’s Cradle – 10/13/12

John Doe at Cat’s Cradle – 10/13/12

Glenn Dicker, co-owner of Yep Roc Records, watches The Sadies from the front row at Cat’s Cradle – 10/13/12

The Sadies with John Doe at cat’s Cradle – 10/13/12

 

 

Gary Glitter Arrested Again

 

No nudge and a wink
this time around, lads.

 

By Blurt Staff

 

Convicted sex offender Gary Glitter (born: Paul Gadd) was
arrested yesterday (Sunday) in London
on “suspicion of sex offences.” The BBC reported that “police have confirmed
they ‘have today arrested a man in his 60s in connection with the
investigation.'”

 

It’s part of the larger investigation into the Jimmy Saville
sex abuse scandal currently embroiling the BBC. The report continues, “Karin
Ward – a former pupil at Duncroft approved school for girls in Surrey – told
the BBC she had once seen singer Glitter having sex with a schoolgirl in
Savile’s dressing room at the BBC. Glitter has denied the allegations.”

 

Glitter, the ‘70s glam rock star of “Rock and Roll (Pt. 2)”
fame, was jailed for a spell in Vietmam in 2006 regarding allegations he had
sexually abused girls, and he was also convicted of possession of child porn in
England
in 1999.

Terry Callier 1945-2012 R.I.P.

 

Masterful song stylist
from the ‘70s and ‘90s.

 

By Fred Mills

 

Seventies folk/jazz guitarist Terry Callier, who experienced
a notable career resurgence in the ‘90s when he was rediscovered by several
influential British musicians (among them, Beth Orton and Massive Attack, who
subsequently collaborated with him), passed away this weekend (Oct. 28) at his Chicago home. He was 67.

 

Callier’s fluid, lyrical guitar style, coupled with an earnestly
soulful voice, powered a modest yet memorable string of albums in the ‘60s and ‘70s,
including 1972’s Occasional Rain. He
later disappeared, however, working and going to school in Chicago throughout the ‘80s. After London’s storied Acid
Jazz label began reissuing his material in the early ‘90s he wound up traveling
overseas to tour successfully, which led to the Orton and Massive Attack
connections. One key latterday album: 1998’s Timepeace, featuring the magnificent track “Lazarus Man.”

National’s Music Used w/o Permission in Ad

 

 

Ohio University Students for Romney apparently haven’t
learned yet that taking music for free is stealing.

 

By Fred Mills

 

Yesterday Pitchfork posted some late breaking news regarding
how a student political group calling itself  Ohio University Students for Romney had made an unofficial
campaign video using The National’s “Fake Empire” as the background music. The
National’s Matt Berninger, noting that they had allowed the Obama campaign to
use it in 2008, posted an indignant screed at the video’s YouTube page:

 

 

Our music was used
without our permission in this ad. The song you’re using was written about the
same backward, con game policies Romney is proposing. We encourage all students
to educate themselves about the differences between the inclusive, pro-social,
compassionate, forward-thinking policies of President Obama and the
self-serving politics of the neo-conservative movement and Mitt Romney. Every
single person involved in the creation of the music you’re using is voting for
President Obama.

 

 

The video was subsequently removed from YouTube, meaning all
the comments were also lost. Howver, over at the Ohio Students’ Facebook page, a slew of commentators continued to weigh in, which led to this particular
exchange:

 

Connor Crawford: are yall the clowns that used the national’s song in some
video? nice work. way to disrespect one of our time’s best bands and your
president.
 

Ohio
University Students for Romney
there
was never any disrespect. we took the video down out of respect for the band,
and we disagree with President Obama…

 

Fred
Blurt
Using
ANY artist’s music without their permission – especially for a political or
social themed ad, and regardless of the artist’s own political bent –
demonstrates utter disrespect for said artist. Sadly, though, in this case it’s
not surprising – you students and your generation are accustomed to stealing
music anyway.

 

‘Nuf sed.

 

 

 

 

 

Jon Spencer Live Webcast TODAY (Oct. 27)

 

Comin’ at you on the
internet radio dial at WFMU.org…

 

By Fred Mills

 

It’s like James Brown on acid – that would be the Jon
Spencer Blues Explosion, currently in the middle of a US tour
promoting their recent album Meat and
Bone
. BLURT’s astute reviewer enthused, “…possibly the band’s best album to date. Do not snooze on Meat and Bone: it is out of
this world and as addictive as Heisenberg’s Blue Sky meth.”

 

So who aare we to argue with ourselves? Meanwhile, this afternoon
(Saturday, Oct. 27) starting at 3pm EST, the Spencer gang will be playing live
on New Jersey’s storied WFMU-FM during Terre T’s Cherry Blossom Clinic program,
which runs to 6pm. So tune in if you dare:

 

http://wfmu.org/tt/

 

 

Tour dates:

 

November
1: Pearl Street
Nightclub – Northampton, MA

November
2: Club Helsinki – Hudson, NY

November
3: Bowery Ballroom – New York,
NY SOLD OUT

November
8: Casbah – San Diego, CA

November
9: El Rey Theatre – Los Angeles,
CA

November
10: Great American
Music Hall – San Francisco, CA

November
12: Doug Fir Lounge – Portland,
OR

November
13: The Crocodile – Seattle,
WA

November
14: Biltmore Cabaret – Vancouver, B.C.

 

Report/Photos: Austin City Limits Fest 2012

 

October 12-14 in
Austin, and once again we had boots on the ground at Zilker Park
(not to mention a few choice after-fest shows in the clubs). Here are a few
highlights. Photos follow immediately after the report. (above): potential
troublemakers

 

Photos and Text by Michael Passman

 

Every year in October since 2002, 70,000+ people pile into
downtown Austin
for Austin City Limits Music Festival. Named after the long running PBS show of
the same name, ACL Festival has been sold out for a number of years now with an
ever diversifying lineup of Americana, electronic, country, classic rock,
r&b, jazz, and alternative acts from around the world.  The formula is
simple with eight stages on 46 acres of Zilker
Park, one of Central
Austin’s downtown parks.

 

        Included in
the festival are local restaurants, merchants, and artists selling their
products, a kiddie stage aka Austin Kiddie Limits, and an infinite number of
porta potties that might exceed the number of lawn chairs people brought this
year.  Although not the largest music festival in the US, it’s
probably the most diverse with acts ranging from The Baylor Choir to The
Stooges, so for those who love diversity and want to see something new, this is
the best festival to do it.  If nonstop music from 11am to 10pm is not
enough, there are ACL related aftershows at local venues every evening.

 

        ACL Festival
2012 kicked off Thursday, the 11th, with The Black Lips playing Antone’s. The
almost always touring band is not stranger to music festivals, but they never
shy away from cutting their teeth at small shows, either.  Legendarily a
blues club, the 600 person capacity Antone’s has lately been expanding from
their blues base, thus luring people a few decades younger than their devoted
crowd.  Rising local stars A Giant Dog started off the evening. The set
was a little rough, but they deliver a great ‘80s punk/pop punch led by one of
the best female vocalists for an underground band, Sabrina Ellis, whose soars,
shrieks and moans lead the crowd mesmerized from start to finish.

 

        The Black Lips
ripped into a long, sweaty, beer drenched set highlighting material from their
last release Arabia Mountain, but also kept
a good dose of earlier material best described as psychedelic tinged, raunchy
garage, or as they coined it, flower punk.  During an interview, they
noted that seemingly far removed things are psychedelic, such as Dadaism. 

 

        The Black Lips
performances are always high energy, but they play with such abandon that the
audience goes wild at every show. Flying beer cans, naked people, and the
occasional not so subtle blow up doll make the crowd become the show end they
end up performing for the band while the band simultaneously performs for
them.  Much like The Fleshtones, the wall between the band and the
audience is broken down. When asked if they could explain the free for all
exercised by their fans, they noted how much they love playing and how the
crowd response encourages them. During their largely attended set on Friday at
ACL Fest, it was obvious how much of a following they’ve garnered over the
years by seeing so many people singing along with them.

 

        The opening
day of ACL Fest started surprisingly strong with big draw acts like Asleep at
the Wheel and The Wombats, followed in the early afternoon by highly praised up
and comers such as Delta Spirit, LP, and The War on Drugs.  As late
afternoon slipped into early evening, newly reunited ‘90s alternative legends
The Afghan Whigs took the stage while indie due Tegan & Sara played the
same time slot on a stage across the park, while plenty of other acts performed
on stages in between.  As Weezer played “The Sweater Song” while the sun
was setting, other attendees were sweating and slamming away to The Black Lips,
Thievery Corporation, Patterson Hood, and the recently acclaimed Florence &
The Machine.  The ever well known, genre blended The Black Keys closed the
evening.  While ACL Fest was nearing a close, The Shins took the stage for
an ACL aftershow at Stubb’s with Bombay Bicycle Club as the opening act.

 

        Saturday
kicked off with acts such as Multi-instrumentalist, soundtrack echoing Caveman,
Nashville’s
country fashionista Nikki Lane,
and the promising Canadians The Deep, Dark Woods, an alt folk band with an
approach combining minimalism and some refreshing embellishments with diverse
instruments such as banjo and mellotron.  The early afternoon saw another
round of promising acts with critical praise, including Civil Twilight and Zola
Jesus.  Neo roots rockers The Whigs (not to be confused with The Afghan
Whigs) brought the rock on in the afternoon while Rufus Wainwright gave a
flawless although without the crowd favorite rendition of Leonard Cohen’s
“Hallelujah”. 

 

        Another much
hyped act debuting in the afternoon was Oberhofer, who impressed the crowd with
a slight psychedelic twist on dance pop. Metric delivered a raving set that
everyone talked about the rest of the afternoon.  A sudden, intense
downpour cut short a set from the touted “favorite new band” Band of
Skulls. The downpour didn’t wash away the enthusiasm of the fans, however.
Before their set resumed, many sought refuge at The Zilker Stage, the only
indoor stage, and were treated to hot ‘70s soul from Lee Fields & The
Expressions.

 

        As the clouds
cleared, The Roots took one of the larger stages.  As Black Thought raised
his hand to the sky and brought the crowd to roar with The Beastie Boys “Paul
Revere” in dedication to MCA. As this transpired, the sudden cold from the
earlier rain turned to warmth.  Of course, another act emerged at the same
time that is found at almost every music festival: Mud.  

 

        Outlaw Country
legend Steve Earle took the crowd into the evening, which closed with the
iconic Neil Young & Crazy Horse performing while the equally influential
(at least in his own mind) Jack White took the stage across the park.

 

        The ACL
sponsored aftershows for the evening included DJ Questlove’s set at Beauty Bar
and a sold out Afghan Whigs show at Antone’s.  The Afghan Whigs have six
members and a large set of white colored Mesa Boogie amps, so the stage would
be cramped, but the show was also sold out, so the floor was equally out of
space.  Centromatic, an alt. rock/Americana band from Denton, TX
took the honor of opening the show.  

 

        The Afghan
Whigs were quite a treat to see at a small venue.  The ‘90s alternative
band best known as being popular during the grunge era, but their music is a
mix of ‘90s alternative and soul.  The combination is unique since they
were among the first during the trendy college/alt. era to embrace rootsier
music.  

 

        Despite the
punk garage base of the band, their sound is expansive, which could be an adaptation to playing much larger crowds, or just a
natural embellishment like many ‘70s soul bands.  Every song felt big, it
filled the room, from the opening intensity of “Scene of the Crime Part One,”
the more popular “Gentlemen” and “Debonair” and the near full crowd sing-a-long
of “Miles iz Ded” with the chorus “Don’t forget the alcohol, ooh baby!” The
crowd was transfixed and sang along for the full hour and a half set. It was a treat of the weekend to see them.  Their music
was a mix of polished angst alternative and nasty soul.  One could call it
clean and nasty.

 

        Sunday’s
festivities started at around the same time, but the larger crowd migration
into the park took place later.  Moon Duo, The Boxer Rebellion, Royal
Teeth, and Stars lured the crowds in around the early afternoon, but many
missed Stooges Guitarist James Williamson perform with The School of Rock band
on the Austin Kiddie Limits Stage at 2:30.  The last day also showed promising
newcomers such as Civil Wars, Polica, and some catchy dance rock/pop from Two
Door Cinema Club, who carried the dubious task of playing while Iggy and The
Stooges fans filled in and cramped the audience area early for their show that
would start an hour after the last band left the stage, mixing with the clean
white frat crowd camped out for The Red Hot Chili Peppers.

 

        Iggy and The
Stooges opened up with “Raw Power.” The set list, mostly taken from the album
Raw Power, seemed nastier and dirtier than the Ron Asheton era songs, although
equally loved.  Iggy invited people on stage to dance with him after the
third song while his cord handler was in the middle of the controlled chaos
making things sure things went smoothly.  Bassist Mike Watt, no stranger
to bass abuse, took some time during the set to beat his axe like it owed him
money and treat his amps like two dollar whores, thrusting hard against them to
the delight of the crowd.

 

        The ever
consummate tease and sex oozed icon at 65 years old, Iggy strutted and thrusted
his way through what could not have been less than a perfect set that included
“Search and Destroy”, “Open Up and Bleed”, and “I Gotta Right”. The set
concluded with the crowd screaming along to “I Wanna Be Your Dog” and a
continued exchange of insults given by Pop to the hungry crowd, which ate every
bit of it and the band’s performance up for an hour.  

 

        As an end to a
perfect evening or just a way to avoid what would feel like a revisit to the
‘90s, many left Zilker Park at the end of Iggy and The Stooges set, opting for a Detroit
state of mind instead of the anticlimactic, dated nostalgia and too many songs
about California.
It was a great weekend, but it after three days, it was time to get on the well
planned shuttle service or hop on their bikes and go home.

 

 

***

 

 

Black Lips

 

 

Black Lips (at Antone’s)

 

 

Sabrina Ellis (A Giant Dog)

 

 

Shins

 

 

Band of Skulls + fans

 

 

 

Lee Fields & The Expressions

 

 

Black Thought (The Roots)

 

 

Centromatic

 

 

Greg Dulli (Afghan Whigs)

 

 

Iggy & the Stooges

 

 

 

Arcade Fire Prepping New LP?

 

Growing beards and
writing tunes… listen to the full radio interview, below.

 

By Fred Mills

 

Pitchfork reports that Arcade Fire drummer Jeremy Gara was
recently interviewed by Ottawa
radio station CKCU 93.1 in
which he disclosed that the band was presently working on a new album. They
hope to release the followup to the award-winning The Suburbs before the end of next year.

 

According to Gara, “We are just working like we always have. We took a
couple months off and we’ve been writing songs. Now we’re in the studio pretty
much full-time just doing what we do. And we kind of shut the door. We haven’t
really gone out and done anything in over a year now. We haven’t done photos or
interviews or anything. We’re just working on music and growing beards and
living at home a lot and going out to dinner together…. We’re not that far into
a record, but we’ve been working for a few months now. We are under no pressure
from record labels or management or whatever to do anything on any sort of
schedule. We’re just working. We have no deadlines. It’s kind of coming along.”

 

Well, that’s specific enough! But any Arcade Fire news is good news, so we’ll take it.


Interview with Jeremy Gara of Arcade Fire – CKCU 93.1 FM by ArcadeFireTube1