Monthly Archives: April 2012

Read: Glenn Hughes' Autobiography

 

Detailed chronicle of the musician’s work with Deep Purple, Black Country Communion and more, as well as a confessional regarding his many excesses.

By Rev. Keith A. Gordon

Glenn
Hughes is a contradiction – the talented singer, songwriter, and musician
remains a relatively obscure figure in America, in spite of his status as a
bona fide rock ‘n’ roll legend. Although you may not have heard of Hughes, or maybe
remember his name only vaguely, chances are that if you’re a fan of ye olde
“classic rock,” you’ve probably heard the “voice of rock”
upon a time.

 

Hughes’
tenure with bands such as Trapeze, Deep Purple, and Black Sabbath during the
1970s and ’80s has long been the stuff of myth, while collaborations with
like-minded musicians like Sabbath’s Tony Iommi, singer Joe Lynn Turner, and
guitarist Pat Thrall have only added to his legacy. Throw in a moderately successful
solo career (especially in Europe) that has yielded almost two-dozen
recordings, and add Hughes’ role as an integral part of the classic rock
supergroup Black Country Communion, and the question becomes not “who is
Glenn Hughes” but, rather, “why haven’t you heard of Glenn
Hughes?”

 

With
better than 40 years of rock ‘n’ roll history behind him, Hughes has some
stories to tell, and tell them he does in Glenn
Hughes: The Autobiography
. Unlike similar celebrity rock bios that either shovel
mud on somebody else (Keith, I’m thinking of you) or mindlessly revel in behavioral
excesses (ahem, Mutley Crew…), the punches that Hughes throws are almost
exclusively thrown at himself. Glenn has been a bad boy through the years, and the decades of soul-seeking and
struggling with addiction he reveals in these pages aren’t shared as
thinly-veiled boasts but rather as cautionary tales.

 

Although
Hughes’ longtime struggle with cocaine is certainly no secret to many in the
industry, the extent to which it threatened to derail his career is shocking in
its extremity. That Hughes managed to come out the other side of decades of
abuse with his musical gifts and sense of humor intact is not only amazing, but
downright encouraging. Aside from the obvious sincerity that shines from the
pages of Glenn Hughes: The Autobiography,
Hughes’ conversational style and the way he frames his story conveys a
friendliness and down-to-earth personality that the average reader can relate
with. Personally, I’ve spoken with Hughes on occasion, and have always been
struck at the ease in which he engages you…it’s like meeting an old friend on
the street and coming away thinking “what a hell of a guy!” 

 

As for the
dirt in Glenn Hughes: The Autobiography,
there’s little of it, really, although Hughes comes embarrassingly clean on a
number of high-profile sexual and romantic liaisons, and offers the truth, from
his perspective, of a number of high and low points throughout his storied
career, most of the self-professed lows involving drugs of one sort or another.
The bio begins with a brief overview of his childhood and teen years, and
touches upon his early musical efforts. Hughes’ first band of note, the
vastly-underrated Trapeze, is covered to some extent, leading up to the
unexpected break that would launch his career into the stratosphere – his
recruitment as a member of Deep Purple.

 

Joining
Deep Purple in 1973 was a huge advance for the young singer and bass player’s
career. Purple were already one of a handful of jet-setting, globe-spanning
superstar rock bands at the time, and Purple’s choice to bring in Hughes and vocalist
David Coverdale to replace Ian Gilliam and Roger Glover had the band’s longtime
fans wondering. Hughes contributed bass and vocals to three of the band’s
mid-to-late 1970s studio albums, and a handful of live discs, and he goes into
detail on his time with the band, his relationships with both old members like
Jon Lord and Ian Paice as well as newcomers like Coverdale and, later, Tommy
Bolin. For a Purple fan, Hughes’ memories of his time with the band – positive and negative – provide priceless inside
info.

 

After the
break-up of Deep Purple, Hughes would be involved with a number of various
projects, some more successful, creatively and/or commercially, than others. There
would be a short-lived Trapeze reunion, a pair of well-regarded albums made
with former Pat Travers guitarist Pat Thrall (Hughes/Thrall); an unsatisfying
collaboration with blues-rock guitarist Gary Moore; and a number of projects
with Tony Iommi, some better than others, that would culminate in the
ill-conceived Iommi solo work cum Black Sabbath album-in-name-only Seventh Star. Some of these projects
Hughes touches upon only fleetingly, others he offers more detail, but often
they are just presented as an interesting aspect of the overall narrative flow.

 

Also only
briefly addressed is Hughes’ seemingly secret career as a studio gun for hire.
Although Hughes’ career is indelibly marked by high-profile band memberships
and musical collaborations, he has also often lent his talents to a lengthy
list of other artists’ recordings. Among Hughes’ session credits are those one
would expect – guest appearances on albums by Purple alumni like Roger Glover,
Jon Lord, and Tommy Bolin – the not entirely unexpected, such as singing with
Pat Travers or Ken Hensley (Uriah Heep), and the surprisingly diverse,
including sessions with the KLF, Motley Crue, Ryo Okumoto, and Quiet Riot,
among many others. One gets the sense that Hughes brought his unique voice to
many of these sessions not for monetary gain (although there probably was some)
but rather because of the immense joy he has in the music.

 

Given
short-shrift by Glenn Hughes: The
Autobiography
is the artist’s lengthy and, at times, brilliant solo career,
which began in 1977 has since resulted in a number of solid albums of Hughes’
trademark funk-infused rock ‘n’ soul music. Although Hughes touches upon a few
of the milestones of his solo work, including his 1977 debut Play Me Out, he concentrates mostly on
his post-sobriety recordings of the 21st century, which include such gems as
2003’s Songs In The Key Of Rock,
2005’s Soul Mover, and 2006’s Music For The Divine.

 

A little
more insight is provided Hughes’ role in the formation of Black Country
Communion with blues-rock guitarist Joe Bonamassa, drummer Jason Bonham, and
keyboardist Derek Sherinian. Hughes has seemingly found a new creative spark
playing alongside these three talented musicians, and the overwhelming European
acceptance of the band’s blues,
rock, and soul hybrid sound has added another interesting chapter to Hughes’ still-ongoing story. Two studio albums
and a live CD and DVD into the career of a band that’s only a couple of years
old, only stateside dominance as eluded Black Country Communion so far.

 

Glenn Hughes: The Autobiography is constructed as a
sort of oral history, with Hughes’ recollections punctuated by commentary from family
(including his wife and parents), friends like Rob Halford (Judas Priest) and
Tom Morello, and former bandmates like Coverdale, Thrall, and Iommi. Woven
throughout Hughes’ tales of famous musicians and various girlfriends, however,
is that of his struggle in the face of overwhelming addiction, including the
self-deceit, the rationalized relapses, and the final moment of clarity where
Hughes heard the voice of God (not literally, tho’ maybe…I’m not revealing any
spoilers!) that led to his current sobriety and obvious joy of life.

 

Overall, Glenn Hughes: The Autobiography tells an
amazing and engaging story – that of the rock star brought down to earth and
subsequently resurrected to enjoy a second (third?) chapter
of his career. One aspect of the book seemingly overlooked by others who have
reviewed it is the perspective of the various people who have offered their
comments on Hughes. Without exception,
they all seem genuinely relieved that Hughes has found peace with himself,
their comments displaying a fondness for the man and an appreciation of his
talents…for Glenn Hughes is living proof that a nice guy can finish first…

 

Obama is Down with Young Jeezy

 

But Kanye West is still a jackass…

By Perez Mills

In a move sure to help sway fence-sitting conservative evangelical white folks NOT to vote for him, President Obama gave a shout-out this weekend to gangsta rapper Young Jeezy. At the annual White House Correspondents’ Dinner Saturday night, he offered, regarding his potential re-election this year, a “quick preview of the secret agenda you can expect. In my first term, I sang Al Green. In my second term, I’m going with Young Jeezy.”

We are down with dat. What, you thought he was gonna give props to Toby Keith and Ted Nugent? Check out the clip from the broadcast, below, which includes the President’s full comedy routine.

 

 

 

Report: Real Estate Live in Denver

 

At the Gothic Theatre on April 27, the
Jersey-based indie darlings got their victory lap. Also on hand? Australia’s
Twerps.

 

By Tim Hinely

I had heard some
recorded stuff by Australia’s
Twerps and liked what I’d heard, and as I arrived at about the 2nd or 3rd song the band already had a hefty crowd eating out of their
palms. Leader/vocalist/guitarist Marty Frawley seemed to take the attitude of a
lot of Aussies I’ve met: don’t worry ‘bout nuffin’, keep smilin’ and the rest
will take care of itself. The tunes I heard seemed to be a good combination of
The Feelies, some mid-‘80s Boston uh, pardon the phrase, college rock,  (ie: Dumptruck,
The Neats, etc.) and the pristine jangle that made those ‘80s Flying Nun bands
so damn good.  If I had one complaint it
was  about the one song that the other,
female, guitarist, sang; being an old punk, I’m no stickler for vocals, but
hers were pretty darnn off-key. But she only sang one song that I saw and her
guitar playing more than made up for it.

 

Speaking of the
Flying Nun years (which I hear are back, by the way) New Jersey’s
Real Estate are not to be missed. They put on a stellar set at Portland’s Doug Fir last
year, touring on the back of their terrific sophomore record, Days and I guess they’re doing a victory
lap (fine with me).  The band seemed a
bit low-key on this evening, however, which may have had something to do with
the somewhat substandard sound.

 

Vocalist/leader
Martin Courtney mentioned a few things to the soundman about a buzzing in the
amps and from where I was standing the sound was, well, not awful or anything,
but all a bit too overbearing, which works with some bands, but a band like
Real Estate you want to hear all of the subtle nuances (and there are plenty).
Still, the band played most of the songs off of said sophomore effort and a
handful off their nearly-as-good debut , “Easy” sounded real nice as did pop
nuggets like “It’s Real”, “Green Aisles”, “Out of Tune”, “Wonder Years” and the
ones they played off the debut (“Suburban Dogs”, Atlantic City”, etc.). Real
Estate are surely on to something and I, for one, can’t wait to hear what they
do on their 3rd record.

 

 

 

Rosewood Bluff’s Matt Brown R.I.P.

 

N.C. musician was much-respected
drummer for John Howie, Jr.’s bands. Pictured, above, second from left.

 

By Fred Mills

 

Sad news over the past few days for North Carolina music fans: Matt Brown,
drummer for John Howie Jr. & The Rosewood Bluff, and previously in the Two-Dollar
Pistols with Howie, passed away from undisclosed causes. There was an immediate
outpouring of condolences at the band’s Facebook page, and on Friday Howie
himself posted a lengthy, emotional tribute to his longtime friend. It read, in
part,

 

 

“Later this year Matt and I would have celebrated ten
glorious years together, merely the beginning of what I’d hoped would be a
decades-long musical journey shared between us, myself and my beautiful friend,
the amazing drummer who almost uniquely never gave up on me or my songs. A
second Rosewood Bluff album was being planned when we met for practice this
past Monday, and I thought we’d be like Johnny Cash and his drummer  W.S.
Holland, ringing in our 40th anniversary of friendship and music as old men.
Tragically, as we all now know, this was not to be, and Matt’s passing is a
loss that me, my music – Hell, all of music – and the world will never recover
from.”

 

 

BLURT would like to extend our own deepest condolences to
Brown’s family and friends, and to the extended Rosewood Bluff family.

 

Read: Glenn Hughes’ Autobiography

 

Detailed chronicle of the musician’s work with Deep Purple, Black Country Communion and more, as well as a confessional regarding his many excesses.

By Rev. Keith A. Gordon

Glenn
Hughes is a contradiction – the talented singer, songwriter, and musician
remains a relatively obscure figure in America, in spite of his status as a
bona fide rock ‘n’ roll legend. Although you may not have heard of Hughes, or maybe
remember his name only vaguely, chances are that if you’re a fan of ye olde
“classic rock,” you’ve probably heard the “voice of rock”
upon a time.

 

Hughes’
tenure with bands such as Trapeze, Deep Purple, and Black Sabbath during the
1970s and ’80s has long been the stuff of myth, while collaborations with
like-minded musicians like Sabbath’s Tony Iommi, singer Joe Lynn Turner, and
guitarist Pat Thrall have only added to his legacy. Throw in a moderately successful
solo career (especially in Europe) that has yielded almost two-dozen
recordings, and add Hughes’ role as an integral part of the classic rock
supergroup Black Country Communion, and the question becomes not “who is
Glenn Hughes” but, rather, “why haven’t you heard of Glenn
Hughes?”

 

With
better than 40 years of rock ‘n’ roll history behind him, Hughes has some
stories to tell, and tell them he does in Glenn
Hughes: The Autobiography
. Unlike similar celebrity rock bios that either shovel
mud on somebody else (Keith, I’m thinking of you) or mindlessly revel in behavioral
excesses (ahem, Mutley Crew…), the punches that Hughes throws are almost
exclusively thrown at himself. Glenn has been a bad boy through the years, and the decades of soul-seeking and
struggling with addiction he reveals in these pages aren’t shared as
thinly-veiled boasts but rather as cautionary tales.

 

Although
Hughes’ longtime struggle with cocaine is certainly no secret to many in the
industry, the extent to which it threatened to derail his career is shocking in
its extremity. That Hughes managed to come out the other side of decades of
abuse with his musical gifts and sense of humor intact is not only amazing, but
downright encouraging. Aside from the obvious sincerity that shines from the
pages of Glenn Hughes: The Autobiography,
Hughes’ conversational style and the way he frames his story conveys a
friendliness and down-to-earth personality that the average reader can relate
with. Personally, I’ve spoken with Hughes on occasion, and have always been
struck at the ease in which he engages you…it’s like meeting an old friend on
the street and coming away thinking “what a hell of a guy!” 

 

As for the
dirt in Glenn Hughes: The Autobiography,
there’s little of it, really, although Hughes comes embarrassingly clean on a
number of high-profile sexual and romantic liaisons, and offers the truth, from
his perspective, of a number of high and low points throughout his storied
career, most of the self-professed lows involving drugs of one sort or another.
The bio begins with a brief overview of his childhood and teen years, and
touches upon his early musical efforts. Hughes’ first band of note, the
vastly-underrated Trapeze, is covered to some extent, leading up to the
unexpected break that would launch his career into the stratosphere – his
recruitment as a member of Deep Purple.

 

Joining
Deep Purple in 1973 was a huge advance for the young singer and bass player’s
career. Purple were already one of a handful of jet-setting, globe-spanning
superstar rock bands at the time, and Purple’s choice to bring in Hughes and vocalist
David Coverdale to replace Ian Gilliam and Roger Glover had the band’s longtime
fans wondering. Hughes contributed bass and vocals to three of the band’s
mid-to-late 1970s studio albums, and a handful of live discs, and he goes into
detail on his time with the band, his relationships with both old members like
Jon Lord and Ian Paice as well as newcomers like Coverdale and, later, Tommy
Bolin. For a Purple fan, Hughes’ memories of his time with the band – positive and negative – provide priceless inside
info.

 

After the
break-up of Deep Purple, Hughes would be involved with a number of various
projects, some more successful, creatively and/or commercially, than others. There
would be a short-lived Trapeze reunion, a pair of well-regarded albums made
with former Pat Travers guitarist Pat Thrall (Hughes/Thrall); an unsatisfying
collaboration with blues-rock guitarist Gary Moore; and a number of projects
with Tony Iommi, some better than others, that would culminate in the
ill-conceived Iommi solo work cum Black Sabbath album-in-name-only Seventh Star. Some of these projects
Hughes touches upon only fleetingly, others he offers more detail, but often
they are just presented as an interesting aspect of the overall narrative flow.

 

Also only
briefly addressed is Hughes’ seemingly secret career as a studio gun for hire.
Although Hughes’ career is indelibly marked by high-profile band memberships
and musical collaborations, he has also often lent his talents to a lengthy
list of other artists’ recordings. Among Hughes’ session credits are those one
would expect – guest appearances on albums by Purple alumni like Roger Glover,
Jon Lord, and Tommy Bolin – the not entirely unexpected, such as singing with
Pat Travers or Ken Hensley (Uriah Heep), and the surprisingly diverse,
including sessions with the KLF, Motley Crue, Ryo Okumoto, and Quiet Riot,
among many others. One gets the sense that Hughes brought his unique voice to
many of these sessions not for monetary gain (although there probably was some)
but rather because of the immense joy he has in the music.

 

Given
short-shrift by Glenn Hughes: The
Autobiography
is the artist’s lengthy and, at times, brilliant solo career,
which began in 1977 has since resulted in a number of solid albums of Hughes’
trademark funk-infused rock ‘n’ soul music. Although Hughes touches upon a few
of the milestones of his solo work, including his 1977 debut Play Me Out, he concentrates mostly on
his post-sobriety recordings of the 21st century, which include such gems as
2003’s Songs In The Key Of Rock,
2005’s Soul Mover, and 2006’s Music For The Divine.

 

A little
more insight is provided Hughes’ role in the formation of Black Country
Communion with blues-rock guitarist Joe Bonamassa, drummer Jason Bonham, and
keyboardist Derek Sherinian. Hughes has seemingly found a new creative spark
playing alongside these three talented musicians, and the overwhelming European
acceptance of the band’s blues,
rock, and soul hybrid sound has added another interesting chapter to Hughes’ still-ongoing story. Two studio albums
and a live CD and DVD into the career of a band that’s only a couple of years
old, only stateside dominance as eluded Black Country Communion so far.

 

Glenn Hughes: The Autobiography is constructed as a
sort of oral history, with Hughes’ recollections punctuated by commentary from family
(including his wife and parents), friends like Rob Halford (Judas Priest) and
Tom Morello, and former bandmates like Coverdale, Thrall, and Iommi. Woven
throughout Hughes’ tales of famous musicians and various girlfriends, however,
is that of his struggle in the face of overwhelming addiction, including the
self-deceit, the rationalized relapses, and the final moment of clarity where
Hughes heard the voice of God (not literally, tho’ maybe…I’m not revealing any
spoilers!) that led to his current sobriety and obvious joy of life.

 

Overall, Glenn Hughes: The Autobiography tells an
amazing and engaging story – that of the rock star brought down to earth and
subsequently resurrected to enjoy a second (third?) chapter
of his career. One aspect of the book seemingly overlooked by others who have
reviewed it is the perspective of the various people who have offered their
comments on Hughes. Without exception,
they all seem genuinely relieved that Hughes has found peace with himself,
their comments displaying a fondness for the man and an appreciation of his
talents…for Glenn Hughes is living proof that a nice guy can finish first…

 

More My Bloody Valentine Reissue Details

 

Glom onto those photos…
being released in the UK
on May 7.

 

By Fred Mills

 

American My Bloody Valentine fans who got excited over the
news that classic album Loveless as
well as Isn’t Anything and the
collection EP’s 1988-1991 had been
given a May 7 release date may have overlooked the fine print: those are
UK-only titles being released in Britain via Sony. Here in the
States, the band’s catalog is in the hands of WEA (Sire having release them
originally), and according to our contact at WEA there are no immediate plans
for a domestic reissue program.

 

Bummer – but a quick visit to Amazon.co.uk can rectify that
if you are the kind of fan who just can’t wait. Loveless in particular looks tasty as a two-CD edition featuring a “DAT
2006 Version” remaster as well as a brand-new remastering job from founder
Kevin Shields. Anyhow, the buzz on the albums is heating up: over at Pitchfork
they have premiered
an unreleased track, “Good For You,” from the EP
collection. And the band has posted a slew of eye-candy images as well to their
Facebook page.

 

Meanwhile, we at BLURT are camping out down at the street
beside our mailbox until May 8 as we preordered the reissues direct from
England and have it on good authority that Shields himself will be parachuting
down to deliver ‘em personally. Yow!

 

 

 

My Morning Jacket/Band Of Horses To Tour

 

 

Kicks into high gear in early August.

By Blurt Staff

Subject header says it all. My Morning Jacket plays Memphis and New Orleans this weekend, then in June will head over to Europe to play a slew of festivals. After that: August brings what will undoubtedly be one of the must-attend summer shed tours, MMJ and Band Of Horses.

7-14 Louisville, KY – Forecastle Festival
7-28 Newport, RI – Newport Folk Festival
8-03-04 Morrison, CO – Red Rocks Amphitheatre  *
8-06 Kansas City, MO – Starlight Theatre *
8-07 Lincoln, NE – Pinewood Bowl *
8-08 St. Louis, MO – Peabody Opera House *
8-10 Somerset, WI – Somerset Amphitheatre *
8-12 Columbus, OH – The LC Pavilion *
8-14 Rochester Hill, MI – Meadow Brook *
8-15 Toronto, Ontario – Echo Beach (Molson Canadian Amphitheatre) *
8-17 Philadelphia, PA – The Mann Center *
8-18 Columbia, MD – Merriweather Post Pavilion *
8-19 Brooklyn, NY – Williamsburg Park  #
8-21 Pittsburgh, PA – Stage AE *
8-22 Chicago, IL – Jay Pritzker Pavilion at Millenium Park *
8-24 Alpharetta, GA – Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre *
8-25 Charlotte, NC – Time Warner Cable Uptown Amphitheatre *
8-26 Raleigh, NC – Raleigh Amphitheatre *

 

* with Band of Horses
# with Shabazz Palaces

 

Vancouver’s Todd Simko R.I.P.

 

Was a core member of ‘90s
alt-rockers Pure as well as an in-demand producer.

 

By Fred Mills

 

Sad news out of Vancouver
yesterday
: guitarist/producer Simko, passed away on April 25, from
as-yet-undisclosed causes. Simko came to fame during the early ‘90s alt-rock
explosion as axeman for Pure, a Reprise Records act that notched several hit
singles (among them “Greedy” and “Blast”). They split up in 2000 and Simko went
on to work with punk/rap singer Bif Naked and also did production and
engineering work with numerous artists including Marcy Playground and Xavier
Rudd.

 

“Not only did you touch all the hearts of people in music
but also in the lives of family, my peers and especially our daughter’s friends
and family,” wife Minna Simko wrote on her Facebook page. “You will forever
remain close by in our hearts and you will be greatly missed by all.”

 

MP3: New Eric Copeland (Black Dice)

 

Solo
album arrives in early June.

 

By Blurt Staff

 

Eric Copeland of Black Dice (also half of the
duo Terrestrial Tones with Animal Collective’s Avey Tare) drops a new solo
album, Limbo, on June 5 via
Underwater Peoples. The label describes it as “feeling like a funked up
alien comic book [and] expanding  his ouvre of layered, pitched, and all-out
fucked sounds toward an easier place, a more familiar musical terrain.
More fleshed out than his earlier work, Limbo’s six parts give it a capacious feel of action. Well organized and having an
undeniable rhythm, the album is an excellent progression from the concepts
explored within throughout his body of work.”

 

Well, all right then! Let’s check out first
single “Louie, Louie, Louie.” Kingsmen fans, don’t get excited, it ain’t that
one…

 

 


Eric Copeland – Louie, Louie, Louie by underwaterpeoples

 

 

Tracklisting

 

1. Double Reverse Psychology
2. Louie, Louie, Louie
3. Muckaluk
4. Fiesta Muerta
5. Tarzan and the Dizzy Devils
6. Lemons

 

 

Video Premiere: Russia’s Mumiy Troll

 

Howdy, amigo: song
comes from new album Vladivostok
which just dropped this week.

 

 

By Blurt Staff

 

It is without a doubt one of the strangest/creepiest, yet
visually straightforward and compelling, videos we have seen in a long time:
that would be “Hey Tovarish” by Russia’s
acclaimed Mumiy Troll, and it is also the rockers’ first English language
platter. A long time coming on that front, indeed, ‘cos the group’s glammy,
Stones-y swagger has found ‘em selling out pretty much everywhere they turn up
for years. Frontman Ilya Lagutenko is a main force behind the group’s charisma,
although this time around the American market push comes with the production
assists of Mike Clink (Guns N’ Roses, Megadeth), Joe Chiccarelli (My Morning
Jacket, The Shins) and Brit Greg Brimson (Bush, Eminem).

 

 

 

 

Lagutenko comments on the video:

 

I was familiar with director
S.F. Porcaro’s past work and I liked his sense of humor and visual style. The
“Hey Tovarish” video is our attempt
to say hello to our new English-speaking friends on the other side of the pond.

 

“Tovarish” means “comrade” in
Russian. In Soviet Russia,
it was considered very formal, but now it’s considered almost politically
incorrect. I felt like I was destined to add a bit of new flavor to the old
word. I believe that rock n roll is one of those magic tricks that allow you to
transform something obvious into something new and exciting. I want
“tovarish” to become the new “amigo.”

 

 

Links:

 

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Vladivostok/dp/B007NUJ218/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1335478307&sr=8-3
iTunes: http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/vladivostok/id512046654
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mumiytrollUS?ref=ts
Official Site: http://www.mumiytroll.com/en/