Monthly Archives: January 2012

Watt on fIREHOSE Reunion: "Our Best Shot"

 

Not quite ready to
commit to a new album yet but – “maybe down the road.” Watch a live video from
1991, below.

 

By Blurt Staff

 

The indie world was abuzz a couple of weeks ago when word got out that Mike Watt’s post-Minutemen band fIREHOSE would be reuniting to play
Coachella, and that eagerly anticipated performance would be preceded by a
two-week west coast tour kicking off April 5. This week at RollingStone.com Watt offered some details about the reunion, include these notes:

 

*”Edward [Crawford,
guitarist] asked me last year
if we would do some gigs again. I have to
kind of plan things in advance, because I have so much going on, and that third
opera, Hyphenated-Man, was coming out, so I said, ‘Edward, can we wait
until next year? I’m a little busy right now.’ The time opened up, so I said,
‘OK, let’s try and do some gigs.’

 

*”fIREHOSE in a way
was a little Minutemen ambassador.
fIREHOSE got much more exposure than the
Minutemen, at the time. And that’s why I think there are a lot of people
thinking about this, because of from their younger days, they remember seeing
us.”

 

*”For these two weeks of gigs, we’re just going to
try and play some of the old ones.
But he was talking about writing songs.
So, I don’t know – maybe down the road [ we’ll record new material].”

 

Read the entire interview at RollingStone.com.

 

 

 

Video: New Feist Single

 

Something about a dog
and Mexico.
Watch a live version of it as well.

 

By Blurt Staff

 

The latest video from Feist’s acclaimed 2011 album Metals is crowd-pleasing favorite “The
Bad In Each Other.” Directed by Martin de Thurah, it was filmed in Mexico, where
strange things begin to happen. Watch it below, and then check out a live
version of the song from the Later With
Jules Holland
show (originally aired on Oct. 18 of last year).

 

 

 


Video: Lost George Harrison Gtr. Solo

 

Archival find stuns Harrison’s son and producer.

 

By Blurt Staff

 

Britain’s NME is reporting about a previously-lost guitar
solo from George Harrison, originally intended to be in “Here Comes the Sun”
but ultimately cut from 1969 Beatles album Abbey
Road
, has been unearthed. According to the report, the tape “was found by Harrison’s son Dhani, Beatles’ producer George Martin and
his son Giles during a visit to the studio which gave its name to the album.”

 

The video below shows the three men “at the mixing desk
playing the original master tapes of ‘Here Comes The Sun’ when they stumble
upon the solo, which Dhani Harrison admits he had no idea existed.” The solo
starts at approximately 1:05 into the video, and while it may seem like not a
huge revelation, in the Beatles world, every little discovery is considered a
big one…

 

 

Report: Kantner/Jefferson Starship Live S.F.

 

Jefferson Airplane’s hi-octane legacy
fuels Paul Kantner’s return to the San
Francisco club scene at the Rrazz Room on January 28.

 

By Jud Cost

 

It’s almost come
full-circle. This is the way Jefferson Airplane got its start in 1965, playing
a tiny sit-down San Francisco club called the
Matrix in the Marina,
a place partially owned by founding member and lead-singer Marty Balin. About
twice the size of the Matrix, the Rrazz Room in the Hotel Nikko booked the Paul
Kantner-led Jefferson Starship for a week, just the way the Matrix did with the
Airplane, Big Brother & the Holding Co. and Quicksilver Messenger Service
in the seminal days of the San
Francisco scene. Kantner, it seems, has always felt
comfortable around clubs. He was spotted frequently during the late-’70s heyday
of San Fran’s Mabuhay
Gardens, at shows by
local punks the Avengers and the Nuns.

 

Kantner, one of
the Airplane’s three principal songwriters and singers along with Balin and
Grace Slick, sits fifteen feet away tonight, looking very relaxed. He’s
bookended by David Freiberg, the bassist/lead singer for Quicksilver while Dino
Valenti was doing jail time. In between the two, singers Cathy Richardson and
Darby Gould admirably carry the female-vocal load this music requires,
surrounded by keyboards, guitar and drums.

 

It should be
noted that Kantner’s resurrection of the Jefferson Starship franchise has
nothing to do with the Mickey Thomas-led Starship that was the final
permutation of the original, post-Airplane Jefferson Starship. Kantner &
crew do not play ’80s chart-toppers like “We Built This City” and
“Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now.”

 

“We’re
going to play some crazy songs tonight,” says Kantner after dusting off
the Airplane’s ace in the hole, “White Rabbit,” early in the set.
Dressed in a Dentyne gum-colored knit frock that looked like a late-’60s Alvin
Duskin creation, something that might have been worn by the fashion-forward
Slick, Gould handles “Rabbit” flawlessly in a style that approaches
but doesn’t mimic Slick. She also excels at “Lather,” a song from the
Airplane’s 1968 Crown Of Creation album that Slick wrote for Airplane drummer Spencer Dryden.

 

Gould and
Richardson together handle lead vocals for “Good Shepherd” (“One
for Paul/One for Silas… Oh good shepherd, feed my sheep”) from the
Airplane’s Volunteers album, the last
of their classic longplayers before things started to spin out of control.
Kantner takes a short break, leaving the spotlight for Freiberg’s energetic version of Quicksilver’s
“Fresh Air,” originally sung by Valenti. It would have been nice to
also hear Freiberg
belt out Hamilton Camp’s “Pride Of Man,” one of the highlights from
Quicksilver’s 1967 debut LP.

 

The next few
numbers are torpedoed visually by the woman seated next to me who decides she
just has to “dance,” moving in a spastic sea anemone way she might
have seen online at vintage Grateful Dead shows. Eventually, she finds a fellow
terpsichorean, and they wobble off together, away from my line-of-sight.

 

“We’re not
too loud, are we?” asks Kantner. “We don’t want to ruin what’s left
of your hearing.” The only sound problem is a distorted mix of Richardson’s vocals,
something gradually fixed by the sound guy. Everybody’s on their feet for the
double-barreled finale. “Volunteers” has the audience ready to enlist
in the next “Occupy San Francisco” army, even if the demographic of
the crowd tonight might muddy the song’s lyrics: “One generation got
old/One generation got soul.”

 

The other shoe
finally drops when they conclude an amazing night with the second song (in
addition to “White Rabbit”) that Grace Slick brought with her from
the Great Society when she replaced the Airplane’s original female vocalist,
Signe Anderson, in October of 1966. “Somebody To Love” was penned by
Great Society guitarist Darby Slick, and the Airplane’s red-blooded version
shot straight to the top of the U.S. charts in the spring of 1967, pulled from
their groundbreaking second album, Surrealistic
Pillo
w. It doesn’t sound quite that good tonight (how could it?). But it’s
great to see Kantner and Freiberg
still playing music that, at one time, looked like it might change the world.

 

First Look: Black Bananas (ex-RTX) LP

 

This is your brain on
drugs: For
Rad Times Xpress IV, out
this week on Drag
City, Jennifer Herrema
expands and expounds upon the Royal Trux/RTX glam-metal-trash-art aesthetic.

 

By Claire Ashton

It’s only fitting that Black Bananas would waylay the world
via Drag City; the same label that began with a
Royal Trux release and remained loyal to sleaze-queen Jennifer Herrema post-split
from bandmate beau Neil Hagerty as she ventured into RTX
territory.  More than a simple
rebranding, this new incarnation goes bananas with Herrema at the wheel and her long-time RTX skinny boys in tow, walloping
you upside the head with an acid-induced mash-up of rollicking glam, gunky metal
and ghetto-fabulous art rock.

 

 


Black Bananas “Rad Times” by goldminesacks

 

Rad Times Xpress IV (Drag City) is the dirty alley where The Make-up and Marc Bolan conceive a love
child; two parts political agenda to one part smeared eyeliner and razor-sharp presence.  Herrema has seen it all, from heroin
addiction to success as a Calvin Klein model and Volcom denim designer, so it’s
only logical that her first venture into Black Banana land is as diverse and
outside of the box as faithful followers would expect.  There’s minimal cohesion throughout the
group’s freshman release, save for heavy bass lines that rival even the
slickest modern hip-hop and metal guitar riffs so smutty they could make any
redneck blush.  Black Bananas cover pop
sensibility (“Hot Stupid”), Slayer on psychotropics (“Killer Weed”), noodling
in the basement (“It’s Cool”), club-hopping (“Acid Song”) and crazy keyboards
that sound like the Millennium Falcon (“Do It”).

 

Less concept
album and more attack of the senses, Rad
Times Xpress IV
sounds like your brain on drugs.  Good drugs.

 

Spiritualized Announces UK, US Tours

 

To coincide with
release of long-overdue new album, natch.

 

By Fred Mills

 

One forthcoming new release we’ve been listening to a lot
here on the BLURT yacht is Sweet Heart
Sweet Light
, by Spiritualized. As previously announced, it drops this
spring via Fat Possum. Today the
band disclosed that major tours of the UK
and North America would unfold in March and
May, respectively – see the dates, below. Sorry, all you SXSWers – the band
will be onstage in England
about the time you are starting to stagger in the crowded streets of Austin…

 

We’ll have plenty of coverage of the band coming up.
Meanwhile, check our 2010 feature on the band, “Post-Teenage Symphonies To
God.”

 

03-16 Nottingham, England – Rescue Rooms
03-17 Portsmouth, England – Wedgewood Rooms
03-19 London, England – Hackney Empire
03-20 Oxford, England – O2 Academy
03-21 Bristol, England – O2 Academy
03-22 Glasgow, Scotland – ABC
03-23 Belfast, Northern Ireland – Mandela Hall
03-24 Dublin, Ireland – Vicar Street
03-25 Manchester, England – Academy
05-02 Minneapolis, MN – First Avenue
05-03 Chicago, IL – Metro
05-04 Detroit, MI – The Majestic Theatre
05-05 Toronto, Ontario – The Phoenix
05-07 New York, NY – Terminal 5
05-09 Boston, MA – Paradise
05-10 Washington, DC – The 9:30 Club
05-11 Philadelphia, PA – Theatre of Living Arts
05-12 Carrboro, NC – Cat’s Cradle
05-13 Atlanta, GA – The Variety Playhouse
05-15 Dallas, TX – The Granada Theatre
05-16 Austin, TX – Emo’s East
05-18 Tucson AZ – The Rialto Theatre
05-19 Phoenix AZ – The Crescent Ballroom
05-20 San Diego CA – Belly Up Tavern
05-22 Los Angeles CA – The Wiltern
05-23 San Francisco CA – The Fillmore
05-25 Portland, OR – The Wonder Ballroom
05-26 Vancouver, British Columbia – The Rickshaw Theatre

 

Watt on fIREHOSE Reunion: “Our Best Shot”

 

Not quite ready to
commit to a new album yet but – “maybe down the road.” Watch a live video from
1991, below.

 

By Blurt Staff

 

The indie world was abuzz a couple of weeks ago when word got out that Mike Watt’s post-Minutemen band fIREHOSE would be reuniting to play
Coachella, and that eagerly anticipated performance would be preceded by a
two-week west coast tour kicking off April 5. This week at RollingStone.com Watt offered some details about the reunion, include these notes:

 

*”Edward [Crawford,
guitarist] asked me last year
if we would do some gigs again. I have to
kind of plan things in advance, because I have so much going on, and that third
opera, Hyphenated-Man, was coming out, so I said, ‘Edward, can we wait
until next year? I’m a little busy right now.’ The time opened up, so I said,
‘OK, let’s try and do some gigs.’

 

*”fIREHOSE in a way
was a little Minutemen ambassador.
fIREHOSE got much more exposure than the
Minutemen, at the time. And that’s why I think there are a lot of people
thinking about this, because of from their younger days, they remember seeing
us.”

 

*”For these two weeks of gigs, we’re just going to
try and play some of the old ones.
But he was talking about writing songs.
So, I don’t know – maybe down the road [ we’ll record new material].”

 

Read the entire interview at RollingStone.com.

 

 

 

Report: Lemonheads Live in Lawrence, KS

 

It’s A Shame About
Ray, performed in its entirety on Jan. 27 and the Granada Theater in Lawrence, was superb. Then
Dando lost the plot, but the band managed to come back strong.

 

Text/Photos by Danny R. Phillips

 

The year of Our Lord 1992 was a solid one for Evan Dando and
his oh-so-sweet power pop band The Lemonheads. That year, their breakthrough
record It’s A Shame About Ray, pushed
by a speeded-up version of the Simon and Garfunkel classic “Mrs. Robinson” shot
them into the alternative rock strata and into my life, forever to stay an
important part of my record collection.

 

Fast forward twenty years: I, along with a reported 1,000
plus aging alt-rock fans all with memories of a long ago lost MTV that played
videos instead of Snooki on a twenty-three hour loop, filed into The Granada
Theater in lovely Lawrence,
Kansas, to relive those few
precious moments before responsibility, jobs, kids and grey hair took over our
realities.

 

We had arrived to see The Lemonheads play It’s A Shame About Ray in its complete,
alt-country, rock and roll wonder. A great idea…. Somewhat.

 

After great sets from opening bands The Dead Girls and
Meredith Sheldon, a droopy eyed Dando took the stage with an acoustic Gibson in
hand to play “Being Around,” “Outdoor Type” and Townes Van Zandt’s “Fraulein”
before summoning the rest of the band to plug in. The audience buzzed at the
opening bars of “Rockin’ Stroll,” it surged with “Ceiling Fan in my Spoon” and
the good vibrations continued throughout every single number on “Ray” from
“Rudderless” to “Bit Part” to “Allison’s Starting to Happen.”

 

 

 

For those 45+ minutes, it was a celebration of a record that
meant so much too so many people. Then the good ship Ferrara Pan began to sink.

 

Halfway through the evening‘s festivities, Evan went
acoustic, solo and self-indulgent. At that point the set began to drag, people
left, hipsters gabbing ironically on their iPhones, boredom setting in en
masse. I could do nothing except
watch and wait, quietly drinking my beer, hoping for the best.

 

 

At what seemed like the point of total loss, the band
ventured back to the stage for some electric action, seemingly in a volume
driven attempt to salvage the
situation. It worked, as the ‘Heads started sprinkling in covers, among them
Edie Brickell (“I Know What I Know”); “Frying Pan” from the Victoria Williams
tribute record Sweet Relief; and
Suzanne Vega‘s “My Name is Luca.” Also in the mix were sporadic Lemonheads
tracks like “No Backbone,” “Divan,” “Just Laugh,” “If I Could Talk, I‘d Tell
You,” “Favorite T” and many others from the band’s long career and many
incarnations.

 

 

I cannot say it was a great show, I cannot say it was a bad
show. It was a 50/50 shot. Moments shined, songs rocked, the band (especially
the drummer) was killer. When it was on, it was topnotch. However, when it was
off, it was way off. A colossal clusterfuck.

 

But it’s like this: I’ll take the bad to get to the good.
The many, many plus sides were worth the down moments. I’m genuinely glad I
ventured out on that cold January night and I’m sure that others who stuck it
out through the lull were glad as well.

 

If for no other reason than to feel young again for just a
little while more.

 

 

 

Theresa Andersson Returns With New LP

 

Loveletter to N’awlins
no less.

 

By Blurt Staff

 

Swedish born, New Orleans based soul singer – and BLURT fave
– Theresa Andersson is back with a new album, Street Parade, a loveletter to her adopted
hometown of two decades. It drops April 24 on Basin Street.

 
Multi-instrumentalist Andersson is best known for her live shows, where she
crafts complexly layered songs using bevy of drums, stringed instruments and
looping pedals. She became an internet phenomenon in 2008, when Youtube
featured a home-made video of her performing a song in her kitchen. The song, “Na
Na Na,”
from her album Hummingbird, Go!, logged 750,000 views in three
days, and has gone on to accumulate nearly 1.5 million views on YouTube. (Read
the review of that classic 2008 album here.)
 

Street Parade, according to the
Andersson camp, “reflects a dreamy Nordic pop sensibility firmly rooted and
influenced by the warm gospel and soul sounds that drew the artist to New Orleans in the first
place.” Note that key track “What Comes Next” opens with a bright horn melody
and mighty drum cadence leading into a powerful chorus on which Theresa is
joined by Peter Moren of Peter Bjorn and John.

 

To celebrate the launch of Street Parade, the singer is partnering with the all female KREWE
OF MUSES
, one of the most entertaining and unique Mardi Gras krewes, to
debut music from her album. Working with renowned puppeteer Arthur Mintz,
creator of the award-winning theater version of Fantastic Mr. Fox, the Mardi Gras performance will feature a puppet-driven
float with Andersson, The Muses, and a 40 piece band of singers, drummers and
horn players performing songs from the album.

 
Concert Dates:

2/16: New Orleans @ MARDI GRAS
3/8: NYC @ Joe’s Pub, 7:30 pm
4/14: Mobile, AL
@ Callaghan’s Irish Social Club
4/18: New Orleans @ Lafayette Square (Free Show), 5pm
5/4: New Orleans
@ JAZZFEST

 

PUNK ROCK BOWLING, VOL. 14

 

 

Annual fiesta features
NOFX, Rancid, The Briefs, The Adicts and Pennywise. And beer.

By Randy Harward

 

Punk Rock Bowling. Insert lame Jerry Maguire joke.

 

It just sounds good. Loud, snotty rock ‘n’ roll + big balls
+ plus lubricated, passive lanes. Add beer. That’s a party.

 

Actually, it’s a music festival happening this Memorial Day weekend (May 25-28). Shawn and Mark Stern (founders
of Youth Brigade and BYO Records) started it in 1999 and it’s now a three-day
festival with five dozen bands. It starts outdoors in the late afternoon on Saturday, Sunday and Monday with
eight bands each day and late-night club shows every night – with some surprises. And get this: There’ll be pool
parties and Texas Hold ‘Em every day.

 

Oh, it’s also in Las Vegas.

 

And the first five bands announced? NOFX, Rancid, The
Briefs, The Adicts and Pennywise.

 

The only thing that’d be cooler is if the initials were PBR.

 

More info: www.punkrockbowling.com