Monthly Archives: March 2011

Third Man Recs w/3 Live LPs This Week

 

Reggie Watts, Cold War Kids and 5.6.7.8’s all join the TMR
roster…

 

By Blurt Staff

 

Jack White’s
Nashville-based Third Man Records drops a trio of live albums today, March 29,
as part of their Live at Third Man series: Reggie Watts (TMR 80, Cold War Kids (TMR 081), and the 5.6.7.8.’s (TMR 076–which features a
guest appearance by Third Man founder Jack White, playing guitar on “I
Walk Like Jayne Mansfield”). 

 All releases will be vinyl LP only, no digital. Limited Black & Blue
vinyl editions will be available at Third Man’s Nashville retail location for those who
attended the shows.

Third Man has also confirmed the next two live performances to be hosted within
the walls of its Nashville HQ:

Friday April 1st, From Austin TX, White
Denim
will appear at Third Man ahead of the release of their fourth album “D,” out this May on Downtown
Records. Then on Friday April 8th, Third Man’s favorite rapper/producer from Detroit, Black Milk, will bring his live band to
perform  at TMR. His fifth self-produced solo album, “Album Of The Year,” was released last year, and he’ll be
following it up by dropping into Third Man Studios to record a single with Jack
White co-producing, for future release as a Third Man 7-inch and digital
single.

Details, natch, at www.thirdmanrecords.com

B.O.M.B. Fest for Memorial Day Weekend

Proceeds go to a good cause, too.

 

By Blurt
Staff

 

Recently announced: the B.O.M.B. Fest in Danbury, CT, a  festival taking place over memorial day
weekend (May 28-29th) at Wester
Connecticut State
University.

 

The all-star lineup includes  Weezer, Snoop Dogg, Wiz Khalifa, Edward Sharpe
and the Magnetic Zeros, George Clinton and P Funk, Wavves, Best Coast, The
New Pornographers, Big Freedia, and a ton more (see below). And all proceeds from
the festival will benefit Bring Our Music Back, Inc. which is committed to
providing music scholarships, music enrichment and education programs, music
and healing initiatives and community support and outreach.

 

Here are more details:

 

Dates: May 28-29th (Memorial Day Weekend)

Location: Western Connecticut
State University (43
Lake Ave, Danbury, CT 06810)

Onsale Link: HERE

Lineup: Weezer // Snoop Dogg // Wiz Khalifa
// Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros // Coheed And Cambria
// Neon Trees // State Radio // George Clinton & Parliament/Funkadelic
// The New Pornographers // Shpongle presents The Shpongletron
Experience // Against Me! // Best
Coast // HEALTH // RJD2
// Titus Andronicus // The Cool Kids // Wavves // EOTO
// Portugal.
The Man // Man Man // Dum Dum Girls // The Felice Brothers
// Dam-Funk // Freelance Whales // Holy Fuck // Daedelus
// Quintron and Miss Pussycat // Dan Deacon // 12th Planet
// Free Energy // Woods // Real Estate // Nosaj Thing
// The Hood Internet // Toubab Krewe // ESKMO // Small Black
// River City Extension // Big Freedia // David Wax Museum
// Roots of Creation // Christine // Ohlman & Rebel Montez
// Walk the Moon

 

 

Beats Working: New Blurt Blog Debuts

 

New BLURT Column spotlighting
“dusty instrumental hip-hop, techno and bass artists” kicks off.

 

By Dominic
Umile

 

When I
pitched a column idea to my patient editor at BLURT, it was with the intention
of carving out a place for its readers to find an intimate discussion of
electronic music, or records that are largely beats-driven, be it dusty
instrumental hip hop, techno, or the subject of this first entry, happenings in
various bass artist circles. My initial idea
was in part informed by a reaction to the instantaneous one-offs and press
release re-posts that are occurring these days with unhealthy frequency. I hope
to offer what I consider a deep and more personal analysis of new (and maybe
older) releases in lieu of the immediate, short-form album appraisals and
so-called “criticism” of “leaked” MP3’s that materialize
within 15 minutes of their mass distribution. I’m calling this endeavor Beats Working because there will be a
lot of talk of beats, and because consuming and thinking about music – whether
it’s on long subway commutes or sifting through records in my apartment – well,
it beats working. I’ve spent a good deal of time lately thinking about the
bass-oriented records that have come my way.

 

***

 

 

The
turbulent third LP from Dave
“2562” Huismans
(pictured, above) rattles so much, it’s unlikely
that you’d ever detect one of the disco samples that allegedly stirs and
stutters at its foundation. The Netherlands-born, Berlin-based producer has
been exploring a haunting dubstep-minimal techno sound for years, and even
though his source material was limited to loops from classic disco vinyl for Fever (no additional synths or drum
programming), the new tracks are far closer to hard, cold techno than the
releases in his recent catalog.

 

 


2562 – Aquatic Family Affair (doubt000 A) by 2562 / A Made Up Sound

 

 

The beats
are deep and pugnacious for Fever,
and the base of pre-album single “Aquatic Family Affair” as well as
the title track treads closely to the rhythmic patterns on Dave Huismans’ 2009
LP
Unbalance, where percussive
thrusts of kick drums and hi-hats drive an affable mix of dubby textures and
hazy techno. Fever is fascinating and
difficult to digest – at times it’s similar to Claro Intelecto’s dim Warehouse Sessions, devoid of the melody
that so frequently underpins the last 2562 outing. “Juxtaposed” is
rich with fluttering sci-fi sonics and long-echoing snare rolls, while Fever‘s mere chunks of bass and metallic
clinks are weaved into track-length machine rumbles on “Flavour Park
Jam” and on the blurting “Cheater.” Huismans trims dizzying
textures down to half-second bits and layers them on top of hard and jumbled
beats for most of the record, while tangible instances of tightly packed 4/4
dance music occasionally bubble to the fore – micro-diced synth bits and
backward swirls on “Brasil Deadwalker” and “Final Frenzy”
are built for a thrilling club set, but certainly nothing here sounds like
disco. Instead, Huismans expands his palette with a perpetually cryptic record
that’s really difficult to explain to your friends. I’ll take that over disco
any day of the week.

 

Drew “FaltyDL” Lustman doesn’t stray noticeably far from
the temperate analog sounds that we generally associate with disco records on
his second proper full-length for Planet Mu. As much play as the more prominent
UK garage and house-inspired dubstep offshoots are getting these days, New
Yorker Lustman has remained ahead of the pack, loading his work with
consistently provocative shifts in color and rhythm. On You Stand Uncertain, Lustman exhibits a refreshing and ever-steady
intention to sweeten lush, late-night house-driven dance music with strong
melodies and loads of atmospherics.

 

 


To London by FaltyDL

 

 

 

Often as
shadowy and hypnotic as the jumbled headphone opus he dubbed Bravery in 2009, You Stand Uncertain is also bright and dramatic, lined with risky
moves that make for the most complete-sounding statement Lustman has issued to
date. The doses of breathy, unfinished garage diva samples and spirited hi-hat
exercises that run through “Voyager” and “It’s All Good”
look back at his well-received debut album, as well as at his flashy Endeavor EP in 2010. Vocalist Anneka
(you heard her on Starkey’s “Stars”) figures into the You Stand… opener’s captivating swirl of
vintage organ keys and jangly percussion – the collaboration, along with two
others here, marks a new direction for Lustman, as he’s previously relied on
vocal samples to establish the intimate feel of his records, rather than invite
another musician into the studio. Live, untreated vocals instead of the usual
pitch-mangled snippets on “Gospel of Opal” are welcome, particularly
in the spots where sparse harmonies fall into place just ahead of the audible
acoustic guitar loops. The harder stuff is here too, in innumerable junglist
drum sources that tumble through “Lucky Luciano,” reminiscent of the streamlined,
breakbeat-backed Phreqaflex
and the
absolutely nasty “Never” remix that Lustman did for West Coast
beatmaker Eprom last year. [LISTEN TO MIX: FaltyDL for Dummy Mag]

 

 

 

 

 

Considerably
less light slips into the straight 17 and a half minutes of whooshing, rubbery
techno that newer UK bass producer Jamie
“Blawan” Roberts
laid down for his danceable Bohla EP, released on R&S. Drums play the biggest role
on this percussively robust three-songer. Roberts’ musical roots are said to
have sprouted behind a drum kit, and it shows, perhaps in the barrage of
rimshots on “Kaz” or in the deep tribal thwacks of the title track.
While Roberts deals an innovative hybrid of alien bass music and tribal house
on Bohla, the Round Black Ghosts compilation on Berlin’s ~scape comes to mind
after his “Lavender” takes off – the 2008 collection features a set of dub and
techno crossovers from artists like Untold and 2562, whose ideas back then can
be compared to the plans Roberts has now.

 

 


BR #47 Blawan by BOILER ROOM

 

 

 

I’m more
likely to return to R&S releases from James
Blake
and Pariah ahead of Bohla, because they’re overall more
aesthetically diverse, with the emphasis on UK garage sounds that I find so
appealing these days, as well as on abundant melodies. Hailing from a town
in Worcestershire, England, a trio called Swarms invests a lot of energy into building melody. They’re producing a psychedelic
but quite polished blend of bass music and chirpy midtempo techno, with heavily
coded guitar lines and frequent vocal samples worked into the mix.

 

 


Flikr of ur eyes by Swarms

 

 

 

Old Raves End, Swarms’ debut full-length for
LoDubs, sits snugly alongside the label’s releases from dubstep well-known
Clubroot, whose sophomore LP is loaded with similarly refined choral textures,
field noise, and somber, ambient 2-step tunes. Clubroot’s best work is in his
understated tracks, and Swarms is also strongest when they’re reining it in.
“Roulette” boasts broad, sweeping synth chords that move along at a syrupy
pace, clashing with the sped-up, indecipherable vocal churning the background.
The same batch of elements work in a slow, massive-feeling cycle for “Sky
Below Sea,” which is equally stirring, but the text msg-friendly
“Flikr of Ur Eyes” is the most comely of the lot. Tenderly strummed
guitars match measured synth swells and whispered vocal cut-ups a la Lali
Puna’s “Faking the Books” on “Flikr…” The beats that
eventually shuffle in barely disrupt this organic stretch, and close listens
summon actual fretboard slides as well as the affecting soft patter of English
countryside rain. [LISTEN TO MIX: Swarms And Geiom]

 

***

 

BLURT contributor and blogger Dominic Umile lives, writes, and
drinks in Brooklyn, NY. Follow him on Twitter: @DominicUmile

 

SXSW 2011 Photos 6: The Recap

 

Sixth  in a series
of image galleries by the BLURT photography crew, from the 2011 South By
Southwest music festival, that took place March 16-19 in Austin. (Pt. 1 is here; Pt. 2
is here;
Pt. 3 is here;
Pt. 4 is here;
and Pt. 5 is here.)

All photos by Tony Landa

 

(above) Tv on the Radio @ Zynga Party 3-14

 

Yeasayer @ Internet Explorer 9 Launch Party 3-14

 

 

Foo Fighters @ Media
Temple Party 3-15

 

 

Young the Giant @ Fader Fort by Fiat 3-16

 

 

Yuck @ Stubb’s 3-16

 

 

Queens of the Stone Age @ La Zona Rosa 3-16

 

 

Duran Duran @ Stubb’s 3-16

 

 

Eliza Doolittle @ Idolator Party 3-17

 

 

The Rural Alberta
Advantage @ Paste Magazine Party 3-17

 

 

Bob Geldof @ ACL Live at Moody Theater 3-17

 

 

The Strokes @ Auditorium
Shores Stage 3-17

 

 

The Bangles @ Cedar
Street Courtyard 3-17

 

 

Joey Kramer (Aerosmith) @ SXSW Bookstore / Austin Convention Center
3-18

 

 

Liz Phair and Wanda
Jackson @
Austin Convention
Center 
3-18

 

 

Le Butcherettes @ Redeye Distribution Party 3-18

 

 

Fitz and the Tantrums
@ Austin
Convention Center 3-18

 

 

Pretty Please @ Mi Casa 3-18

 

 

Liam Finn @ Dickies Party 3-18

 

 

Matt and Kim @ Fader Fort by Fiat 3-18

 

 

Charles Bradley and the Menahan Street Band @ Cedar Street
Courtyard 3-18

 

 

Wild Flag @ MOG Party 3-19

 

 

Rachel Goodrich @ Bayou Lounge 3-19

 

 

Bright Eyes @ Auditorium
Shores Stage 3-19

 

 

Omar Rodriguez-Lopez Group @ Emo’s Annex 3-19

 

 

Space Camp Exhibit @ SXSW Trade Show / Austin Convention Center

 

 

Domo Exhibit @ SXSW Trade Show / Austin Convention Center

 

 

Internet Explorer 9 Exhibit @ SXSW Trade Show / Austin Convention
Center

 

 

Mapquest Exhibit @ SXSW Trade Show / Austin Convention Center

 

Google Exhibit @ SXSW Trade Show / Austin Convention Center

 

Read: Essential Book on Prog-Metal

 

 

Mean
Deviation: Four Decades of Progressive Heavy Metal, penned by Jeff Wagner and published by Bazillion points, legitimizes
heavy metal and the titular prog-metal with an academic sheen, albeit delivered
with a fanboy’s enthusiasm. Pointed-headed, buzz-coiffed, hoodie-rocking indie
and punk purists need not apply…

 

By Rev.
Keith A. Gordon

 

Heavy
metal, perhaps, is the only musical offshoot of rock ‘n’ roll upon which is
heaped more critical scorn than progressive rock. As for “progressive
metal,” the bastard love child of 1970s-era prog-rock and 1980s-style
heavy metal, well… forgetaboutit! There’s nothing that will shut down a mainstream critic’s synapses and brick
off their ears faster than hearing those two magic words… “progressive
metal.” You know the type, the kind of guys and gals that wax ecstatic
over a new Mars Volta album, chanting in a chorus of the band’s
“progressive elements” even while turning their faces into a
corpselike grimace at the mention of a truly radical band like Meshuggah.

 

Enter
music historian Jeff Wagner and his enormously informative tome Mean Deviation, published by the
estimable rawk folks at Bazillion Points (the house also behind the stellar
volume Touch And Go: The Complete
Hardcore Punk Zine ’79-’83
, previously covered by BLURT). The former editor
of Metal Maniacs magazine and a bona
fide, died-in-the-wool heavy metal fan, Wagner has thought this stuff over,
listened to the music, come to his conclusions, drafted the charts and, well,
wrote the definitive book on the evolution of progressive metal music over the
past four decades. Just because many blockheaded critics refuse to sully their
reputations with anything deemed “metallic” doesn’t mean that you
have to deny your medulla oblongata the enjoyment of this challenging and often
exhilarating genre of music.

 

Wagner
charts the beginning of progressive metal’s long crawl towards a modicum of
commercial acceptance to the collision of twin early-1970s musical phenomena:
the first generation of prog-rock bands like King Crimson, Genesis, Yes, and
ELP; and proto-metal trailblazers like Black Sabbath, Rainbow, and Judas
Priest. These important, ground-breaking bands would, in turn, begat the likes
of Canada’s Rush and Voivod, the “New Wave of British Heavy Metal”
bands like Iron Maiden and, subsequently, Wagner’s “big three” of
influential progressive metal bands.

 

 

Wagner’s
“big three” consists of a trio of hard-to-pigeonhole, metal-leaning
bands: Queensryche, Fate’s Warning, and Dream Theater. As theories go, his
isn’t a bad one, and while I personally would lend more credence to Voivoid’s
influence on a subsequent generation of prog-minded, technically-oriented
metalheads, I’ll gladly bow to Wagner’s greater expertise in this matter.
Explaining the musical accomplishments and importance of each of these three
bands, Wagner patiently lays out the effect of each band’s influence and how they’ve
helped prod along the evolution of this critter called progressive metal.

 

Mean Deviation isn’t content merely laying the entire
prog-metal thing at the feet of the “big three,” Wagner frequently
straying off the path to explore many darkened corridors. The author ventures
into such vastly-unexplored regions as tech-metal cult bands Voivod (yay!) and
Watchtower; thrashers-turned-existentialists like Atheist and Cynic; and death
metal progenitors like Celtic Frost. Along his literary sojourn, Wagner
gleefully explores the 1980s and ’90s-era underground metal scenes in Northern
Europe and North America, going into exhaustive and welcome detail on such
adventuresome metal outfits as Death, Pestilence, Realm, Spiral Architect,
Psychotic Waltz, and a wealth of other obscure-but-considered bands.

 

The fruits
of decades of prog-metal evolution and revolution are covered by the last
chapters of Mean Deviation, Wagner
highlighting the musical accomplishments of such contemporary merry pranksters in
the genre as Opeth, Meshuggah, Porcupine Tree, and even unlikely international
artists as Japan’s
Sigh and Gonin-Ish. A lengthy appendix to Mean
Deviation
provides capsule bios of better than two-dozen worthy bands that
didn’t make it among the dozens covered in the main text, while another
appendix offers a handy list of recommended progressive metal albums to
jump-start a collection, from Angra’s Holy
Land
to Zero Hour’s The Tower of
Avarice
, with albums from Dream Theater, Fates Warning, Rush, Voivod, and many
others rounding out the list.

 

Wagner’s
prose is lively and informative, entertaining while providing the music fan
with plenty of considerations for future purchase. Heck, even the Reverend has
ponied up a couple of sawbucks for albums on Wagner’s recommended list, which
is no little feat, indeed. The lasting importance of Mean Deviation, however, isn’t the random additions to one’s music
collection, or even the well-deserved coverage that the author provides the
aforementioned bands in the book.

 

Mean Deviation legitimizes heavy metal and progressive
metal with an academic sheen, albeit delivered with a fanboy’s enthusiasm.
Often unfairly belittled, many of the bands championed by Wagner have
contributed greatly to the ever-changing history of rock music, delivering
overlooked, but no less worthy albums that have influenced mainstream artists
in ways that many casual fans may be unaware. Mean Deviation is more than a textbook of progressive metal,
Wagner’s impressive work cause for reconsideration of his subject matter and,
in the long run, greater acceptance of a music that is often challenging and
difficult. Plus, this profusely-illustrated and deeply-researched book is just
a hell of a lot of fun for both the dedicated metal fan and the newbie alike… the
Rev says “check it out!”

 

Kim Salmon Returns w/Precious Jules

That blurry, fuzzy photo above? Why, the latest glam/punk
(masquerading as garage) sensation!

 

By Blurt Staff

 

Precious Jules are Kim Salmon
(of Scientists/Surrealists/Darling Downs and other Australian combos fames )and
Mike Stranges residing in Melbourne,
operating as a slick pop partnership, masquerading as a ‘glam/punk’ combo,
masquerading as a ‘garage’ duo.

 

They’ve got their debut single just
out: ‘Pearls Before Swine’ backed with ‘Chinese Rocks’, and it is, as the
saying goes, a corker. If you are familiar with Salmon’s output over the past 4
decades, you’ll need no convincing. Check ‘em out at the Battle Music website: www.battle-music.com.

 

Kim Salmon featured at Blurt: “Blurting
With… Kim Salmon”

 

 

“Precious Jules”: A Poem

 

What are these Precious Jules
That all the ladies truly covert
They’ll lead you to your certain ruin
And then think nothing of it.
Dangling surreptitiously
Yet somehow in your faces
Deflating your economy
To inflate your airs and graces
What are these Precious Jules
That shine so dark before us
Dazzling darkness all around
Only to ignore us
What are these Precious Jules
So idly hanging round
Your Precious necks or
In your ear
Wishing only to be found
Acceptable for come what may
With ‘come what maybe’ clowns

 

 

Junos = Arcade Fire + Justin Bieber!

 

Don’t stop beliebing,
kids….

 

By Blurt Staff

 

All those Grammy haters who had a problem with indie rock
schmucks Arcade Fire being celebrated at the expense of the multifaceted,
multiplatinum Justin Bieber at this year’s Grammy Awards can feel vindicated:
last night at the annual Juno Awards in Canada, the Biebster took home two
trophies.

 

Billboard is reporting that Bieber won the fan choice Juno
award plus Best Pop Album (My World 2.0).

 

Of course, Arcade Fire nabbed four awards: Best Group, Best
Album, Alternative Album, Best Songwriter.

 

So, who else listened to “A Prairie Home Companion” this
past weekend and heard that awesome Guy Noir segment in which they poked fun at
Bieber…?

 

Radiohead Newspaper Posted to the Web

 

 

Potential eBay artifact surfaces in PDF form at New Zealand site…

By Blurt Staff

Following Friday’s news about the free newspaper that Radiohead is circulating this week as part of their promotional campaign for King of Limbs, we now learn (via Pitchfork) that long-running New Zealand music tab/zine Rip It Up has turned the paper into PDF form and posted it to their website.

You can check it out here, although be advised that the web traffic may be heavy at the moment as it seems difficult to pull up the RIU site.. But keep trying.

 

 

PRS Guitars Launches “ABC’s of SXSW”

 

Internet radio show debuts on New Normal
Music this week.

 

What do you get when you invite 15
great bands showcasing at SXSW to record acoustic numbers in a wine cellar
decked with recording equipment, a former XM radio DJ, and two PRS acoustic
guitars? You get internet radio’s new kid, New Normal Music, and their upcoming
series “The ABC’s of SXSW on NNM.” Airing March 28 through April 1 on www.newnormalmusic.com,
this uniquely indie acoustic program will feature wine-cellar recordings of
fresh-faced artists performing exclusively with Paul Reed Smith acoustic
guitars direct from SXSW 2011. “The ABC’s of SXSW on NNM” will play back these
acoustic sessions in alphabetical order and will be hosted by NNM DJ’s Art and
Tobi.

 

Bands like Dale Ernhardt Jr. Jr., the
Moondoggies, Alcoholic Faith Mission, Apex Manor (whose Ross Flourney is
pictured, above, playing a PRS acoustic), and Small Sins were all part of this
VIP project showcasing PRS acoustic guitars. PRS provided a 25th Anniversary PRS Acoustic (with a retail value of $20,000) and one not yet named
prototype PRS Acoustic for the performances. The guitars were well received,
with all the bands opting to use PRS even though some had lugged their own
equipment to the venue. And when Iceland’s FM Belfast showed up for
what was supposed to be just an interview, all bets were off when they strummed
their very first PRS acoustic guitar. FM Belfast dug the sound of the
instrument so much that they sorted out an acoustic version of their electronic
song “Underwear” right on the spot, which turned out to be the band’s
first ever acoustic recording. Canada’s
Small Sins even captured a bit of video from their PRS acoustic session. You
can check out the clip here:

 

 http://www.spinner.ca/2011/03/20/small-sins-sxsw-road-report/?fb_ref=article&fb_source=profile_oneline 

 

 

Be sure to listen to the “The ABC’s of
SXSW on NNM” March 28 through April 1 at www.newnormalmusic.com

 

 

Daily Lineup:

 

MON, 3/28 Acrylics, Alcoholic Faith Mission,
Apex Manor

TUE, 3/29 Cary Brothers,
Chris Bathgate, Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr.

WED, 3/30 FM Belfast, Jeremy Messersmith, Small Sins

THU, 3/31 Someone Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin, Tahiti
80, Taylor Locke and the Roughs

FRI, 4/1 The Lonely Forest, The
Moondoggies, Young Man

SAT, 4/2 & SUN, 4/3 Entire week of specials will air consecutively in alphabetical
order.

 

 

Daily Airtimes:

 

6 am PST / 9 am EST

10 am PST / 1 pm EST

2 pm PST / 5 pm EST

7 pm PST / 10 EST

 

 

PRS Guitars Launches “ABC’s of SXSW"

 

Internet radio show debuts on New Normal
Music this week.

 

What do you get when you invite 15
great bands showcasing at SXSW to record acoustic numbers in a wine cellar
decked with recording equipment, a former XM radio DJ, and two PRS acoustic
guitars? You get internet radio’s new kid, New Normal Music, and their upcoming
series “The ABC’s of SXSW on NNM.” Airing March 28 through April 1 on www.newnormalmusic.com,
this uniquely indie acoustic program will feature wine-cellar recordings of
fresh-faced artists performing exclusively with Paul Reed Smith acoustic
guitars direct from SXSW 2011. “The ABC’s of SXSW on NNM” will play back these
acoustic sessions in alphabetical order and will be hosted by NNM DJ’s Art and
Tobi.

 

Bands like Dale Ernhardt Jr. Jr., the
Moondoggies, Alcoholic Faith Mission, Apex Manor (whose Ross Flourney is
pictured, above, playing a PRS acoustic), and Small Sins were all part of this
VIP project showcasing PRS acoustic guitars. PRS provided a 25th Anniversary PRS Acoustic (with a retail value of $20,000) and one not yet named
prototype PRS Acoustic for the performances. The guitars were well received,
with all the bands opting to use PRS even though some had lugged their own
equipment to the venue. And when Iceland’s FM Belfast showed up for
what was supposed to be just an interview, all bets were off when they strummed
their very first PRS acoustic guitar. FM Belfast dug the sound of the
instrument so much that they sorted out an acoustic version of their electronic
song “Underwear” right on the spot, which turned out to be the band’s
first ever acoustic recording. Canada’s
Small Sins even captured a bit of video from their PRS acoustic session. You
can check out the clip here:

 

 http://www.spinner.ca/2011/03/20/small-sins-sxsw-road-report/?fb_ref=article&fb_source=profile_oneline 

 

 

Be sure to listen to the “The ABC’s of
SXSW on NNM” March 28 through April 1 at www.newnormalmusic.com

 

 

Daily Lineup:

 

MON, 3/28 Acrylics, Alcoholic Faith Mission,
Apex Manor

TUE, 3/29 Cary Brothers,
Chris Bathgate, Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr.

WED, 3/30 FM Belfast, Jeremy Messersmith, Small Sins

THU, 3/31 Someone Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin, Tahiti
80, Taylor Locke and the Roughs

FRI, 4/1 The Lonely Forest, The
Moondoggies, Young Man

SAT, 4/2 & SUN, 4/3 Entire week of specials will air consecutively in alphabetical
order.

 

 

Daily Airtimes:

 

6 am PST / 9 am EST

10 am PST / 1 pm EST

2 pm PST / 5 pm EST

7 pm PST / 10 EST