Monthly Archives: August 2009

About That Noel Gallagher Oasis Split

 

Good riddance to bad
news, we say. Oasis, please stay broken up. From your friends at BLURT.

 

By Fred Mills

 

While the music biz buzz over the weekend was clearly
centered around Noel Gallagher’s surprise announcement at the Oasisnet.com site
that he was quitting the band he’d founded, perhaps it’s less instructive to
parse Gallagher’s words than those of the folks who determined their level of
punditry qualified them to do the parsing.

 

First, that Gallagher statement, posted late Friday:

 

“It’s with some
sadness and great relief to tell you that I quit Oasis tonight. People will
write and say what they like, but I simply could not go on working with Liam a
day longer. Apologies to all the people who bought tickets for the shows in Paris, Konstanz and Milan.”

 

All currently scheduled Oasis concerts were cancelled in the
wake of the statement. Apparently the band had been preparing to perform Friday
at a French music festival, but the two brothers had a huge argument – one observer,
singer Amy McDonald, would subsequently Twitter, “Oasis cancelled again with
one minute to stage time! Liam smashed Noel’s guitar, huuuge fight!” –
leading the festival organizers to announce that the show was off: “The group
no longer exists. They will not play tonight and they are cancelling the rest
of their European tour… The group no longer exists. They will not play tonight
and they are cancelling the rest of their European tour.”

 

On Saturday Britain’s
Daily Mail looked into the situation,
pointing out that relations between the brothers had deteriorated in recent
months to the point that they “traveled separately on tour and only saw each
other onstage.” (Periodically the two have taken potshots at one another during
separate interviews.) The paper also posted photos of Liam plus the other Oasis
members leaving their Paris
hotel.

 

Let’s not forget, however, that this isn’t the first time
Gallagher has split from his brother and his band – acting, depending on your
point of view, like a diva or just drunk and pissy – as he briefly quit in 2000
at a show in Paris. Liam Gallagher, for his part, famously “quit” in 1995 on
the eve of a U.S.
tour, although that was short-lived as well. As the Gallagher’s mom Peggy told
reporters this weekend, “They’re just tired at the end of the tour.
They’ve had fights before and got over it. The funny thing is, they didn’t
fight as children. They didn’t fight until they started the band.” And
erstwhile Creation Recs boss Alan McGee chimed in as well, telling the BBC, “It’s
obviously the worst fall-out that they’ve ever had, and they’ve had some pretty
bad ones. But they love each other. They’ll come back together.” So it’s
probably way too early to predict whether or not this marks a final divorce or
just another temporary separation.

 

Speculation among insiders is that Liam’s heavy drinking on
the tour may have been the trigger in all this; the singer reportedly had been
acting out and insulting everyone around him, including his brother’s family.
After leaving Paris, Liam left for Italy with his
wife Nicole. By Saturday, Noel had taken to the band’s website again to clarify
his position:

 

“I feel you have
the right to know that the level of verbal and violent intimidation towards me,
my family, friends and comrades has become intolerable,” the guitarist
said. “And the lack of support and understanding from my management and
band mates has left me with no other option than to get me cape and seek
pastures new.”

 

 

Still, when a professional turd like Perez Hilton weighs in on the personal foibles of a rock band, it’s entirely possible that said rock
band has, in the parlance, jumped the
fucking shark
anyway. Leave it to Hilton to dredge up the most unseemly
quote in the whole Liam-versus-Noel tit-for-tat. Hilton wrote on his site:

 

“A recent remark Liam made regarding Noel’s daughter, Anais,
was reportedly the final nail in the coffin for Noel! Liam allegedly ‘jokingly
suggested’ that Noel was not the real father of his 9-year-old daughter!!!

 

“‘It was a dumb thing to say,’ an
insider close to the brothers says. ‘They had a big fight when he made the gag.
Noel went for him. He was in a blind fury. And he still hasn’t calmed down.’
Noel considered his brother’s comment ‘unforgivable,’ which led to his abrupt
exit from the band.”

 

 

Ah well… who cares. The band was long past its expiration
date. Can anybody even name a song or album title of the band from the past
half-decade or so?

 

Good riddance, Oasis. Please, don’t get back together. Save
us the drama.

 

 

Strung Out Strings It Out for 20 Years

Announces 7th studio album to mark two decades of doin’ it their way.

 

By Blurt Staff

 

With six studio albums, five 7-inches, two EPs, a live CD, a
B-sides album, and numerous soundtrack and compilation appearances under their
belts, SoCal punks Strung Out are venturing once more into the record bins.
Mark your calendars for Sept. 29 when they release their seventh studio LP, via
Fat Wreck Chords.

 

“With Agents Of The Underground, I wanted to
acknowledge the fact that we are still alive and kicking just below the
consciousness of the mainstream media and are celebrating our place here in
“The Underground”,” says Strung Out vocalist Jason Cruz. “Like a
resistance movement, we move freely and without boundaries. We say what we feel
and do it all our own way, and we’ve done it all this time without radio,
without TV, and without the help of a corporate record label. We are the
essence of what the punk rock movement started out as and has strayed so far
from. We are living proof that you can succeed by doing things your own way.”

 

The band proves on Agents Of The Underground that
they are still doing it their own way after all these years. Unlike previous
releases, the five-piece enlisted an existing fan of the band, Cameron Webb (Motorhead,
Ignite, Social Distortion
), to produce the album, which helped the group
record their strongest album to date. “We’ve done a lot of touring and made a
lot of records,” admits Cruz, “and we have learned A LOT. I have a tendency to
defy expectation and abandon what has already been achieved, and Cameron was
great at balancing what people want to hear from Strung Out, and at the same
time, letting the band move forward. I believe this album is truly the
culmination of everything we’ve done.”

 

Santa Cruz and Santa Barbara fans can
get their first taste of the new album by checking out the band during the
group’s upcoming live shows (see dates below). That will be followed
in October with a full U.S.
tour.

 

 

Sep 5 – Santa Barbara, CA @ Velvet Jones (21+)
Sep 6 – Santa Barbara, CA @ Velvet Jones (18+)
Sep 25 – Long Beach, CA @ The Shore
Oct 1 – San Antonio, TX @ Rock Bottom
Oct 2 – Austin, TX @ Red Seven
Oct 3 – Dallas, TX @ Granada Theatre
Oct 4 – Houston, TX @ Meridian
Oct 5 – New Orleans, LA @ Howlin’ Wolf
Oct 7 – Tallahassee, FL @ The Engine Room
Oct 8 – Ft. Lauderdale, FL @ Culture Room
Oct 9 – St. Petersburg, FL @ The State Theatre
Oct 10 – Orlando, FL @ The Social
Oct 11 – Jacksonville, FL @ Freebird Café
Oct 12 – Atlanta, GA @ The Masquerade – Downstairs
Oct 14 – Fayetteville, NC @ Jester’s

Oct 15 – Raleigh, NC @ Volume 11 Tavern  
Oct 16 – Virginia Beach, VA @ Ohana’s Night Club
Oct 17 – Jermyn, PA @ Eleanor Rigby’s
Oct 18 – Columbus, OH @ The Basement
Oct 19 – Toledo, OH @ Frankies
Oct 20 – Milwaukee, WI @ Turner Hall
Oct 22 – Sauget, IL @ Pop’s
Oct 23 – Tulsa, OK @ The Marquee
Oct 24 – Albuquerque, NM @ Launchpad
Oct 25 – Colorado Springs, CO @ Black Sheep
Oct 27 – Fort Collins, CO @ Aggie Theatre
Oct 28 – Casper, WY @ Downtown Grill
Oct 30 – Layton, UT@ V2
Oct 31 – Tempe, AZ @ The Clubhouse
Nov 1 – Victorville, CA @ Karma

 

 

 

Letters from the Road: Kaiser Cartel

More than a guest post this week… it’s a guest Mad Libs. All their idea. In case you needed another reason to fall in love with these guys :-):

kaisercartel

Photo by Anthony Byrd

Dear (name of person) Jeffrey,

Before leaving on tour, we made sure to pack the (noun) banana in preparation for two-weeks on the road in (name of country) Kazakhstan. At our first show, we were fortunate to have (name of famous person) Andy Warhol as a support act. By the time we went on stage, the audience, at first, was (adjective) outrageous but by the end of the show they warmed up to us and became (adjective) sugary []

A Triple-A radio programming veteran, Kate has served as Music Director of the Loft at XM, Midday Host at WYEP, Evening Host at both WNCS and WUIN, as well as Content Supervisor for Pump Audio. Currently, she’s the CEO of Outlandos Music, a new-music discovery service for grown-ups. Kate has been nationally recognized for her ardent presentation of music and her ability to champion talented, compelling artists.

Ebony vs. Ivory? Blame It on the Beatles

Would you like to know how John, Paul, George, and Ringo destroyed
rock’n’roll? Me too, which is why I read all the way to the end of Elijah
Wald’s How the Beatles Destroyed Rock’n’Roll, even as I became
increasingly doubtful that the book would justify its title.

It sure doesn’t. In fact, the Beatles feature only in the introduction,
epilogue, and final chapter (out of 17). The narrative runs from around 1890
to 1970, and spends relatively little time with the Fab Four. Paul Whiteman,
an early-20th-century big-band leader, gets much more ink than Paul
McCartney.

In many ways, How the Beatles Destroyed Rock’n’Roll is not a bad book. But
it doesn’t deliver on its title, which is a bait-and-switch tease, or even
its subtitle: An Alternative History of American Popular History.

Alternative to what? To rock cultists who celebrate only the most obscure,
least commercial examples of the genre, apparently. But such people aren’t
all that common — they couldn’t be, or the music they prize wouldn’t be
obscure. And most of us cultists don’t deny the appeal of mainstream pop. I
like Future of the Left, but am aware that Taylor Swift sells significantly
better.

While surveying pre-Let It Be pop in some detail, Wald advances two
theses, which are not entirely compatible. The first is that all (or nearly
all) innovation in American popular music comes from African-Americans. The
second is that white and black U.S. musicians were influencing each other
long before the 1950s.

Anyone who’s been paying attention already knows the latter. It’s convenient
to suppose that 1954, the year of Elvis Presley’s debut and Brown vs. the
Board of Education
, was a bolt of lightning that demolished cultural
barriers and freed white teenagers to dance to “That’s All Right, Mama.” But
the endless argument over the “first rock’n’roll record” keeps pushing the
genre’s origins back to performers, both black and white, who significantly
predate Elvis.

Wald is aware of that. In his research, he found that Ella Fitzgerald was
singing about “rock and roll” with a ballroom orchestra in 1937. And she
surely wasn’t the first person to use the phrase.

If such revelations are less than startling, Wald’s book does offer some
entertaining minutiae. I was charmed to learn, for example, about DJ shows
in the early days of TV that illustrated the music with abstract or random
imagery: Detroit’s Pat’n’Johnny Show displayed “parakeets, canaries,
hamsters, rabbits, guinea pigs, tropical fish and other animals while
records spin.”

I have some quibbles, a few of them related to my hometown, Washington, D.C. To illustrate the importance of brass bands in the earliest days of the
recording industry, Wald notes that Columbia Records’s first catalogue,
published in 1890, listed 50 cylinders by the U.S. Marine Band, then under
the direction of popular march composer John Philip Sousa. But he doesn’t
mention that Columbia, Sousa, and the Marine Band were all based in D.C. If
Columbia had been founded in New Orleans or Kansas City, its repertoire
would have been rather different. (He also misses the importance to Al
Jolson of a childhood spent in ethnically and racially mixed southwest D.C.,
and Washington’s role in “hillbilly” music after World War II.)

To Wald’s credit, much of the material to rebut his arguments is right there
in his own book. He charts an 80-year process in which “hot”
African-American rhythms gradually overwhelmed “sweet” Euro-American
melodies and arrangements. Yet he concedes that plenty of black musicians
emulated white ones, and not just during the big-band era. In the 1950s,
when Presley and other rockabilly types were getting raucous, the
top-selling black performers included Nat King Cole and Johnny Mathis.

#How the Beatles Destroyed Rock’n’Roll# seeks to elevate commercial
judgments over artistic ones. It wants to know which performers innovated,
but is more interested in which ones attracted a crowd. Yet these two things
can’t be balanced exactly — as every rock writer knows. While Wald travels
further back in time than many rock chroniclers, the art-versus-commerce
contradictions he encounters won’t surprise thoughtful observers.

The book starts to get in real trouble around 1959, when Joan Baez signs to
the liberal-minded folk label Vanguard, rather than Columbia, the domain of
eclectic (and omnivorous) producer Mitch Miller. The new generation of “pop”
musicians who cared more about their idea of authenticity than about
pop-chart success challenges the author’s simplistic analysis. Something
happened in the 1960s, and Wald doesn’t know what it was.

He continues to assume that pop music is validated foremost by commercial
triumph. So he shortchanges Bob Dylan and the Rolling Stones, despite their
enormous influence, because their records didn’t sell all that well. And he
treats the free agents of the rock era like the journeymen of an earlier
age: He writes that “Atlantic used Eric Clapton and Duane Allman on
recordings by [Aretha] Franklin and [Wilson] Pickett,” as if 1970s
rock-guitar gods were 1930s session players dependent on producers for a
gig.

Wald’s essential gripe is that art-rock separated white music from its black
cousin, and he thinks rock has suffered from that breach. Despite its title,
however, the book spends very little time explaining how everything went
wrong.

It seems to all come down to Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,
certainly not one of funkiest records of its time. Wald even credits the
Beatles’s psychedelic-music-hall period for “opening the way for the Velvet
Underground.” Yet the bulk of Velvets’s first album was recorded in April
1966, when the Beatles’s latest single was “Nowhere Man.” #Sgt. Pepper’s#
was only 14 months away, but those 14 months would be very eventful.

And the Beatles’s acid-washed experiments didn’t last long. By 1968, Lennon
would be writing blues-based stompers; in 1969, McCartney would instruct his
own band to “get back to where you once belonged.” If the Beatles destroyed
rock’n’roll, they quickly turned to reviving it.

Wald’s book reads like a very long introduction to a history that’s yet to
be written. He discusses only a few of the myriad influences that led to
psychedelic rock and its various successors, and ends a tale that chronicles
immense diversity and complex interaction by trying to pin late-’60s rock
entirely on a single band. Also, because he’s so laden with pop history,
Wald can’t hear what’s new in post-Beatles music that recasts ’50s and ’60s
rock.

If the Beatles forever separated white artiness from black earthiness, what
explains the Pop Group’s punk-jazz, Talking Heads’s Afro-punk, Prince’s
new-waved soul, DJ Spooky’s art-school hip-hop, or the Dirty Projectors’s
high-life guitars? Or the rappers who sampled Kraftwerk, Led Zeppelin, and
the Police?

What really happened to rock in the ’60s and ’70s was not that it split in
two, but that it splintered into thousands of pieces. A history that
stitched together those fragments would be more useful than How the Beatles Destroyed Rock’n’Roll, which simply hangs new details on a long-established historical framework.

The gap between black and white American music from 1890-1970 isn’t that
hard to explain: The country was racially segregated. That a sort of musical
segregation continues — although it’s not so straightforward as Wald
imagines — is a much more interesting topic. It calls for someone to wr
ite
a history, but not an “alternative” one, and not one that attempts to fit
the sprawling jumble that is popular culture into rigid ideological
template.

I hate Led Zepplin

I hate Led Zeppelin. That’s not true. I don’t hate them; I just don’t buy into all the hype.
I’ve tried to fit in… especially in high school. I had a couple tapes though never really listened to them. Just kept them around for appearances. I even drew the ZOSO symbols from their fourth album on the white rubber part of my Chuck Taylors in 9th grade. I chalk that one up to peer pressure.
Robert Plant has a cool voice; Agreed. Jimmy Page is a great guitar player; No argument here. John Bonham kicked ass on the drums; No doubt. Individually they are brilliant. But put them all together and you’ve got a rock decent band, with a jones for old blues songs, but not THE defining moment in rock. They are pretty much the Blue Oyster Cult with better PR.
What most Zeppelin fans won’t ever admit (regardless of how often these deep dark thoughts creep into their sweaty little heads) is that the idea of Led Zeppelin, the legend behind the band – everything from the wild groupie sex stories to the rumors of Satan worship – is far, far greater than the band’s actually musical contribution.  
Name a song that you can’t possible live without. “Stairway to Heaven”?  “Whole Lotta Love”?  “Rock and Roll”?  I’ll take a Replacement’s song any day of the week.

Nirvana’s Legendary Reading Concert Now a DVD set

 

Perhaps released to combat an already-issued bootleg DVD, hmm?

 

By Blurt Staff

 

According to the press release, “Nirvana’s August 30, 1992 headlining appearance at the UK’s Reading Festival is one of the most bootlegged concerts in the annals of rock’n’roll.”  If that’s the case, bootleggers be damned, because a licensed copy of that entire performance — color-corrected video from the original film and improved audio matering–will soon be available. Nirvana Live At Reading will be issued in a limited edition CD+DVD Deluxe Edition as well as DVD-only, CD-only configurations on November 3, 2009, followed by a 2 LP version on November 17, 2009.

                            

While much of the show was a performance of the Nevermind tracklist, also noteworthy were early performances of “All Apologies,” “Dumb,” and in its first ever public performance, “tourette’s.” You’ll also note on the track listin gbelow covers by the Wipers and Fang(!) as well as older numbers from Bleach.

 

Only 2 of the 25 performances on the DVD have ever been released before.

 

Nirvana Live At Reading DVD:

1.     Breed

2.     Drain You

3.     Aneurysm

4.     School

5.     Sliver

6.     In Bloom

7.     Come As You Are

8.     Lithium

9.     About A Girl

10.   tourette’s

11.   Polly

12.   Lounge Act

13.   Smells Like Teen Spirit

14.   On A Plain

15.   Negative Creep

16.   Been A Son

17.   All Apologies

18.   Blew

19. Dumb

20. Stay Away

21. Spank Thru

22. Love Buzz*

23. The Money Will Roll Right In

24. D-7

25. Territorial Pissings

 

*not included on CD

 

Incidentally, earlier this year a bootleg DVD of the same show was released titled Life Take No Prisoners. You can compare the tracklisting, below, to the official release:

01. The Rose/Intro
02. Breed
03. Drain You
04. Aneurysm
05. School
06. Sliver
07. In Bloom
08. Come As You Are
09. Lithium
10. About A Girl
11. Tourette’s
12. Polly
13. Lounge Act
14. More Than A Feeling/Smells Like Teen Spirit
15. On A Plain
16. Negative Creep
17. Been A Son
18. All Apologies
19. Blew
20. Dumb
21. Stay Away
22. Spank Thru
23. Love Buzz
24. The Money Will Roll Right In
25. D-7
26. Territorial Pissings
27. The Star Spangled Banner

You Are Here Festival Invades Brooklyn

 

“Expect something unusual”: Participating artists include
TROUBLE (Sam Hillmer & Laura Paris) // Calvin Johnson // Screaming Females
// Mick Barr // Up Died Sound // Skeletons and the Kings of All Cities //
Alexis Gideon // Ty Segal // Regattas // Nine 11 Thesaurus // Sam Mickens //
Dome Theater // Mike Pride // Extra life // Pygmy Shrews // Effi Breist // John
Fell Ryan // The Coathangers // Desolation Wilderness // Random Cutting //
Excepter // Symbol // Zs // Arrington Dionyso // Dan Friel // Mega Calderos //
Chuck Bettis // Pterodactyl // Normal Love // Vaz // Make A Rising // Clan of
the Cave Bear // Electroputas // High Red Center // The Sian Alice Group // The
Present // Loud Objects // Grooms // Symbol // Shooting Spires // Crash Diet
Crew // Videohippos

 

By Blurt Staff

 

You Are Here (The
Maze) is a performance festival in a sculptural maze taking place at Williamsburg’s Death By Audio venue (49 South 2nd St, Brooklyn) from September
10 – October 2, 2009, with performances starting each evening at 9pm and
running late.

 

 Emphasizing the
sprawling and interconnected nature of New
York’s underground, a trip through the maze offers a
peak inside NYC’s diy art/music scene. A meditation on passage and desire, You Are Here engulfs the space and
presents beckoning inhabitants, dead ends, and uplifting epitaphs. Medium and
genre vary and overlapping and simultaneous performances are frequent, each
performer establishing a different corner or dead end as his or hers.
Participating artists in the 3-week festival include Calvin Johnson, Screaming Females, Skeletons and the Kings of All Cities,
Zs, Excepter, Mick Barr, The Coathangers, Knyfe Hyts, The Present, Loud
Objects, Grooms, Effi Briest, Extra Life, Mike Pride, Dan Friel, Ninjasonik,
Vaz, Pygmy Shrews, Nine 11 Thesaurus, and many many others.

 

For more information, visit: www.myspace.com/youareheremaze

 

The tentative schedule is
below, although the You Are Here
organizers hasten to add that it’s all intended to “subvert prefab expectations
for both audiences and performers-there is no prescribed order, start time or
end time, duration, location of performance, relation of audience to
performers, and so on. All of the participating artists have been asked to
create something site-specific since the performances will, in fact, take place
within the maze. Audiences will be asked only to expect something unusual.”

 

Maze Schedule

Thursday 9.10.09

Skeletons Big Band
Knyfe Hyts
Pterodactyl
Gowns
Dan Friel
Social Junk
Mincement
+Delicious Beverages

Friday 9.11.09

The Sian Alice Group
Nine 11 Thesaurus
Experimental Dental School
Reading Rainbow
+Delicious Beverages

Saturday 9.12.09

Extra Life
Lichens
Pygmy Shrews
Up Died Sound
SETH (jeff and lala from excepter)
Interdependence Project
+Delicious Beverages

Sunday 9.13.09

The Present
Opsvik & Jennings
Rich Johnson
Blast Off!
+Delicious Beverages

Monday 9.14.09

Calvin Johnson
Arrington Dionyso
Desolation Wildnerness
Regattas
City Center

Tuesday 9.15.09

Loud Objects
Twisty Cat
Random Cutting
Mega Calderos
Aftermath

Wednesday 9.16.09

White Suns
Chaos Magic
Little Big
Buckets of Bile
Bird Music

Thursday 9.17.09

Grooms
Videohippos
Starring
PC Worship
Anamanaguchi
Dome Theater

Friday 9.18.09

Ty Segal
The Mantles
The Holy Experiment
BJ Rubin
Worlddancearound
Dome Theater
+Delicious Beverages

Saturday 9.19.09

High Red Center
Alexis Gideon
Make A Rising
Shelly Short
Ribbons
+Delicious Beverages

Sunday 9.20.09

Vaz
Clan of the Cave Bear
Necking
Baby Birds Don’t Drink Milk
+Delicious Beverages

Monday 9.21.09

Sam Mickens/Mike Pride Duo
Jantar
Nsumi
Tbd

Tuesday 9.22.09

Drummer’s Corpse
Hunter Gatherer
Aaron Seigel
Meredith Arena

Wednesday 9.23.09

Shooting Spires
Legs
Grafitti Monsters
Crime Novels
Lord Easy

Thursday 9.24.09

Sam Hillmer/ Arrington Dionsyo
Duo
Charlie Looker
Daniel Carter Quartet
Total Bolsheviks

Friday 9.25.09

Effi Briest
Electroputas
Regattas
Chuck Bettis / Mario Diaz de Leon
BJ Rubin
Dome Theater
+Delicious Beverages

Saturday 9.26.09

The Sleepy Doug Shaw
Hannah Marcus / Tianna Kennedy
The Screaming Females
Cheap Ventilators
The Weird Fantasy Band
+Delicious Beverages

Sunday 9.27.09

Symbol
Laurel Halo
The Slowest Runner in the World
Post Abortion Stress

Monday 9.28.09

Telecult powers
Syn. Toffs
Bassoon
Alterazioni Video Collective

Tuesday 9.29.09

The Coathangers
Nervehunt (Justin from Teeth
Mountain / Ryan from
Wavves)
Xray Eyeballs
Swimmingcitiesoceanofblood

Wednesday 9.30.09

Nymph
Emma Kupa (of Standard Fare)
Ava Luna

Thursday 10.1.09

Crash Diet Crew
Cntrl Top
Hotchacha
Islands Eyelids
Deborah Karp/ Meredith Arena

Friday 10.2.09

Zs
Excepter
Mick Barr
Noveller
BJ Rubin
Dome Theater
+Delicious Beverages

 

 

 

 

Trampled By Turtles (hurts so good!)

 

For fans of Avett Brothers, Old
Crow Medicine Show, String Cheese Incident, Del McCoury Band and more.

 

By Blurt
Staff

 

 

Hard-twanging,
string-bending Minnesota
roots band Trampled by Turtles, are headed out on a 40+ date fall tour. The
coast to coast run will have them on the road literally up to Christmas so you
have no excuse not to catch ‘em along the way. They’ll be supporting their
recently-released Duluth album.

 

If you
need convincing, check out some songs at their sites:

 

www.trampledbyturtles.com

 

www.myspace.com/trampledbyturtles

 

 

Separating
the band from the pack is the contrast of their lightening fast punk-influenced
barn-burners and their lonesome Townes Van Zandt-inspired ballads. As Artvoice Buffalo put it, “”Their
most recent release, Duluth, mirrors
the raw intensity of their live performances, which are sure to leave audiences
simultaneously raising hell and crying in their beers.”

 

They’ll buy you a beer, too.

 

 

Tour Dates:

 

August 30
| River City Roots Festival | Missoula, MT
August 31 | Urban Lounge | Salt Lake City, UT
September 2 |Alive After Five | Boise, ID
September 4 | Pig Out in the Park | Spokane, WA
September 5 & 6 | Chilliwack Bluegrass Festival | Chilliwack, BC
September 9 | Oak Park Theater | Minot, ND
September 10 | West End Cultural Centre | Winnipeg, MB
September 12 | Harvest Festival | Clarks Grove, MN
September 19 | Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion | Bristol, TN
October 11 | Middle East | Cambridge, MA
October 12 | Monkey House | Winooski, VT
October 14 | 92 Y Tribeca | New York, NY
October 15 | Iron Horse | Northampton, MA
October 16 | Narrows Center | Fall River, MA
October 17 | The Ale House | Troy, NY
October 18 | A.B.C. | Harrisburg, PA
October 20 | IOTA Club | Arlington, VA
October 21 | Pour House | Raleigh, NC
October 22 | Whitehorse Black Mountain | Black Mountain, NC
October 23 | Smith’s | Atlanta, GA
October 24 | Deep Roots Festival | Milledgeville, GA
November 6 | First Avenue | Minneapolis, MN
November 10 | Shank Hall | Milwaukee, WI
November 11 | High Noon | Madison, WI
November 12 | Radio Radio | Indianapolis, IN
November 13 | TBA | Kentucky
November 14 | Blueberry Hill | St. Louis, MO
November 19 | Red Carpet | St. Cloud, MN
November 20 | The Aquarium | Fargo, ND
November 21 | Ramkota Hall | Sioux Falls, SD
November 28 | TBA | Chicago, IL
December 4 | Doug Fir | Portland, OR
December 5 | Tractor Tavern | Seattle, WA
December 6 | Sam Bond’s Garage | Eugene, OR
December 7 | TBA | Ashland, OR
December 9 | TBA | Arcata, CA
December 11 | TBA | Santa Cruz, CA
December 12 | TBA | San Francisco, CA
December 14 | Urban Lounge | Salt Lake City, UT
December 16 | Belly Up | Aspen, CO
December 17 | Hodi’s Half Note | Fort Collins, CO
December 18 | Bluebird Theater | Denver, CO
December 19 | Bluebird Theater | Denver, CO

 

 

 

 

Nirvana's Legendary Reading Concert Now a DVD set

 

Perhaps released to combat an already-issued bootleg DVD, hmm?

 

By Blurt Staff

 

According to the press release, “Nirvana’s August 30, 1992 headlining appearance at the UK’s Reading Festival is one of the most bootlegged concerts in the annals of rock’n’roll.”  If that’s the case, bootleggers be damned, because a licensed copy of that entire performance — color-corrected video from the original film and improved audio matering–will soon be available. Nirvana Live At Reading will be issued in a limited edition CD+DVD Deluxe Edition as well as DVD-only, CD-only configurations on November 3, 2009, followed by a 2 LP version on November 17, 2009.

                            

While much of the show was a performance of the Nevermind tracklist, also noteworthy were early performances of “All Apologies,” “Dumb,” and in its first ever public performance, “tourette’s.” You’ll also note on the track listin gbelow covers by the Wipers and Fang(!) as well as older numbers from Bleach.

 

Only 2 of the 25 performances on the DVD have ever been released before.

 

Nirvana Live At Reading DVD:

1.     Breed

2.     Drain You

3.     Aneurysm

4.     School

5.     Sliver

6.     In Bloom

7.     Come As You Are

8.     Lithium

9.     About A Girl

10.   tourette’s

11.   Polly

12.   Lounge Act

13.   Smells Like Teen Spirit

14.   On A Plain

15.   Negative Creep

16.   Been A Son

17.   All Apologies

18.   Blew

19. Dumb

20. Stay Away

21. Spank Thru

22. Love Buzz*

23. The Money Will Roll Right In

24. D-7

25. Territorial Pissings

 

*not included on CD

 

Incidentally, earlier this year a bootleg DVD of the same show was released titled Life Take No Prisoners. You can compare the tracklisting, below, to the official release:

01. The Rose/Intro
02. Breed
03. Drain You
04. Aneurysm
05. School
06. Sliver
07. In Bloom
08. Come As You Are
09. Lithium
10. About A Girl
11. Tourette’s
12. Polly
13. Lounge Act
14. More Than A Feeling/Smells Like Teen Spirit
15. On A Plain
16. Negative Creep
17. Been A Son
18. All Apologies
19. Blew
20. Dumb
21. Stay Away
22. Spank Thru
23. Love Buzz
24. The Money Will Roll Right In
25. D-7
26. Territorial Pissings
27. The Star Spangled Banner

LCD Soundsystem 45:33 Remixes Due

 

Padded Cell, Prince
Language and others do the deed…

 

By Blurt Staff

 

DFA Records will release a brand new collection of remixes of
the classic LCD Soundsystem musical epic 45:33 as a series of vinyl 12 inch singles this Summer before releasing the whole set
as a CD/Download album on September 15th.

One of the most unique pieces of modern dance music ever released, 45.33 was originally a one off
collaboration on iTunes for Nike, but was subsequently released on and expanded
CD & Vinyl in its own right in Nov ’07 due to overwhelming demand.

James Murphy (LCD Soundsystem, DFA Records founder etc) is currently in the
studio recording the follow-up to 2007’s massively critically acclaimed Sound Of Silver album, set to drop in
early 2010.  

 

45:33 was integral
to shaping Sound Of Silver, and here segments & parts of the record have
been lovingly and respectively re-interpreted by some of dance music’s most
innovative players. The Tracklisting is as follows:
 

1. Runaway Remix
2. Prince Language Remix
3. Prins Thomas Diskomiks Remix
4. Theo Parrish’s Space Cadet Remix
5. Trus’ Me Remix
6. Padded Cell Remix
7. Pilooski Remix
8. Riley Reinhold Remix